DSST Business Ethics Study Guide sm 2

The incidence of child labour in the world decreased

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without restrictions and without parents' consent at age 16. The incidence of child labour in the world decreased from 25 to 10 percent between 1960 and 2003, according to the World Bank. [3] Fair Labor Standards Act: An Overview of Federal Child Labor Laws
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The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) establishes child labor standards (as well as minimum wage, overtime  pay, equal pay, whistleblower, and record keeping standards).  These standards affect full-time and part-time  workers in the private sector and in federal, state, and local governments. The FLSA's child labor provisions are designed to protect the educational opportunities of minors and prohibit  their employment in jobs and under conditions detrimental to their health or well-being.   The FLSA regulates child labor by (a) setting minimum ages for jobs that have been determined to be  particularly hazardous, (b) setting minimum ages for all other jobs (that is, jobs that are not considered  particularly hazardous), and (c) limiting the hours that children are permitted to work.  There are also  exceptions to some of these requirements.   Minimum Age for Particularly Hazardous Work: The FLSA distinguishes between particularly hazardous work for children and other work that is not  considered particularly hazardous. The minimum age for particularly hazardous work in agriculture is age 16, whereas the particularly hazardous  work in all other sectors of the economy is age 18.  These minimum ages are established by law, and would  require an act of Congress to be changed. The FLSA gives the Secretary of Labor the discretion to issue regulations describing what occupations in  agriculture and in all other sectors of the economy are particularly hazardous to children.  These regulations  are called Hazardous Occupation Orders (or more commonly Hazardous Orders or HOs). There are 11 Hazardous Orders in agriculture that forbid children under age 16 from doing any of the  following jobs: 1. Operating a tractor in most situations. 2. Operating or assisting to operate specified machinery such as grain combines, hay mowers and  balers, feed grinders, and power post-hole diggers. 2. Operating or assisting to operate trenchers or earth-moving equipment, fork lifts, potato combines,  and power-driver circular, band, or chain saws. 3. Working on a farm in a yard, pen, or stall occupied by a bull, boar, or stud horse maintained for  breeding purposes; a sow with suckling pigs; or a cow with newborn calf (with umbilical cord 
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present).
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