Milosz writes so we blink our eyes as if a tiger had sprung out and stood in

Milosz writes so we blink our eyes as if a tiger had

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harsh words to create an image for the reader. Milosz writes, “so we blink our eyes, as if a tiger had sprung out / and stood in the light, lashing his tail”(8-9). This is the first time he makes a
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reference to an outside force influencing the writer of a poet. It is also where the poem takes a dark turn. Milosz writes, “That’s why poetry is rightly said to be dictated by a daimonion, / though it’s an exaggeration to maintain that he must be an angel”(9-10). A tiger is one thing, but a daimonion that dictates the poet sounds bizarre. Milosz was very blunt with this statement, and even justifies it. This might make the reader feel uncomfortable, but Milosz doesn't stop there. He continues to elaborate on this idea. Milosz writes, “for our house is open, there are no keys in the doors, / and invisible guests come in and out at will”(31-32). The poet makes it very clear that spirits come into people when they write poetry. He poses a whole new perspective on poetry. He isn’t afraid to address the topic, and he does it very straightforward regardless of how it’ll make the reader feel. Many readers will be skeptical, but Czeslaw Milosz it’s a reality for him. This is why he believed poetry should be written only when necessary. Along these lines, Marianne Moore is a poet who dislikes writing poetry. She is a poet who really appreciates a good poem, and can’t stand half-assed poetry. Marianne Moore does an excellent job posing her view on poetry speaking in her own voice, and then gives an example of what poetry should be. The poet makes it clear in the beginning line of the poem that she doesn’t like writing poetry. However, she enjoys to read it because of what it evokes in the reader. Moore writes, “Hands that can grasp,eyes / that can dilate, hair that can rise” (4-5). This gives the reader a clear picture of what poetry could do to the reader. It challenges the reader to wonder if that happens when they read a poem. It’s almost
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  • Fall '19
  • Poetry, Ezra Pound, Czeslaw Milosz

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