When materials and material thickness varies and having a diamond tool for each

When materials and material thickness varies and

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When materials and material thickness varies and having a diamond tool for each operation isn’t feasible. If initial cost outlay is critical and a higher upfront tool price isn’t tolerated for cash flow reasons even though it will save much over time. If material is prone to inclusion of staples, nails etc. (diamond tools are susceptible to impact damage). If the machine is older and has excessive spindle runout, or parts tend to move on the table .... stick with carbide. If machine operators are poorly disciplined and wouldn’t handle a diamond tool with the gentle respect it deserves. If customer is not prepared to invest in a complete setup to insure the diamond tool is capable of performing to expectations, i.e. doesn’t want to replace the collet or invest in a heat shrink tool holder. Customer is cutting parts that require plunging straight down into the material (this creates a lot of heat that will cause the PCD tool to wear prematurely.
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1-800-544-8436 A TYPICAL COST COMPARISON OF A CARBIDE COMPRESSION VS DIAMOND TOOL The below comparison is based on both tools being sharpened twice and does not include setup cost or machine downtime, nor does it factor in that after sharpening a carbide spiral, clearance is lost and thus lower tool life cycle is achieved. Life Cycle estimate 24:1 - a conservative value! Comparison Data Carbide Diamond Initial Tool Cost $65.00 $388.00 Sharpening Cost $16.50 (x2) $125.00 (x2) Tool Life 85 panels 2000 panels Formula: Cost per panel = Tool Cost = (number of sharpenings x sharpening cost/ea) 1 + number of re-sharpenings x tool life (panel count) Carbide Tool = $65 + (2 x $16.50) = $98.00 = $0.38 per panel (1+2) x 85 255 Diamond Tool = $388 + (2 x $125) = $638.00 = $0.11 per panel (1+2) x 2000 6000
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1-800-544-8436 The next two pages contain information that is critically important to preventing tool breakage and maximizing tool life. Please take the time to review.
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1-800-544-8436 CHIP LOADS / RPM / FEED SPEED Correct chip load is an important factor to extend tool life and avoid premature tool wear! The chip load is the size of the chip the tool makes during the cutting cycle and it is calculated based on the number of flutes on the tool, the spindle speed and the feed progression. The below chart is a starting point reference range only! The below range is based on cutting depth being equal to cutting diameter. For deeper cuts, adjust the chip load as follows: for 2x diameter, reduce by 25%, 3x diameter reduce by 50%. Tool Diameter Hardwood Plywood MDF/Praticleboard Soft Plastic Hard Plastic Acrylic Solid Surface 1/8" .003" - .005" .004" - .006" .004" - .007" .003" - .006" .002" - .004" .003" - .005" .002" - .004" 1/4" .009" - .012" .011" - .013" .013" - .016" .007" - .010" .006" - .008" .008" - .009" .006" - .009" 3/8" .014" - .018" .017" - .020" .020" - .023" .010" - .012" .008" - .010" .010" - .012" .008" - .010" 1/2" .019" - .021" .021" - .023" .025" - .027" .012" - .016" .010" - .012" .012" - .015" .010" - .012" Calculating Chip Load: Calculator available here: The formula is: Chip Load = Feed Rate (inches per minute) / (RPM x number of flutes) Example: Feed rate of 500” per min / (16,000 rpm x 2 flutes) = 500/32000 = Chip Load is .015” To calculate feed rate on the fly: Example: Using a 2 flute 3/8” compression bit cutting MDF, and rpm of 16,000 Your formula is: (16,000x2) x .023 (chip load per schedule above) = 736”/minute (adjust based on cut depth)
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  • Fall '19
  • Tools
  • Drill bit, PCD, Cutting, Diamond tool, Diamond Tools

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