To avoid this trap use the following voice techniques Pitch refers to high or

To avoid this trap use the following voice techniques

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To avoid this trap, use the following voice techniques: Pitch refers to high or low range of sound. Varying the pitch avoids monotone. Slowing down for emphasis, or speeding up to get through familiar material, helps the audience with variety. Raising the voice to make a point or lowering it to cause closer listening from the audience are techniques of emphasis. Voice quality is an innate characteristic but can be fine tuned through varying pitch and speed. Last, as with using a video camera for seeing how you look in front of an audience, you can tape your voice to hear how you sound to an audience. If you find any distractions, you should work on correcting them. Visual Aids With the sophistication of technology, many visual aids are available to use as supplements to your presentation. You might prepare charts, graphs, maps, diagrams, cartoons, photographs, or other graphics, most of which can be presented on a large screen through use of a personal computer. As with written text, the graphics are a supplement, not a substitute, for the content of your presentation. When designing them, be sure that they serve the function of communicating information. In your presentation, you might want to use an electronic pointer to highlight features and to explain what the graphic shows. Frequently today, presenters use film clips, CDs, CD-ROMs, and other sophisticated materials. Again, a personal computer with projector can display these items on a large screen. The same rules of use apply as with other graphics. Last is the familiar PowerPoint presentation. With minimal training, you can produce a PowerPoint presentation to accompany your presentation. The Nature of Oral Reports In contrast to formal presentations, which are most often delivered to audiences outside of your organization, oral reports are most often internal communications.
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For example, you might be called on at a regularly scheduled department meeting to update the committee on a project for which you are responsible. Such an oral report would be fairly informal in nature, focusing on a specific task relevant to the committee. On a more formal level, you might be asked to report on a new employee evaluation plan at an executive board meeting. Even though the meeting is still internal, it would require a greater level of formality. You would need to put greater effort into the preparation and would need to dress more formally for this audience. In some sense, such an oral report could demand nearly as much preparation as a formal presentation to an outside audience. Differences Between Oral and Written Reports To deal with internal communications, you can sometimes choose your vehicle of delivery. The choice is between writing the report and in delivering it orally.
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