But none of this matters to the ones who make the choice the patients

But none of this matters to the ones who make the

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then but natural to reject the thought of legalizing euthanasia. But none of this matters to the ones who make the choice, the patients themselves, who just want to end their suffering, and as fellow human beings we must understand the hopelessness and pain these patients must go through. The patient should be the one to decide whether the ending of their own life is evil or morally wrong and in the end their wishes must be respected and upheld. There is no easy answer, no right or wrong, so in the end it should come down to their choice. A terminally ill patient who is competent enough to make his or her own decisions should be granted the right to choose and receive active euthanasia or physician assisted suicide. Many arguments on euthanasia focus on a person’s right to death. Supporters argue that just as one has the right to freedom, privacy, and autonomy, one should have the right to death (Crocker, 2013, p. 7). In the Rodriguez case, Sue Rodriguez accused the ban on assisted suicide to be a violation of her rights of personal liberty and autonomy. (“The fight for the right to die,” 2013). Proponents of euthanasia frequently claim that it is a human right for terminally ill patients to choose when and how one dies and a patient should be able to choose to die in dignity rather than slowly, succumbing to a long and painful death. They believe only the patient themselves can weigh the benefits of living with dying and form a proper, rational decision based
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on their own experiences. Therefore a terminally ill patient has the right to choose whether to live or die. On the other hand, opponents take a different viewpoint and state that the right to life is not the same as the “right to death”, claiming that their death also concerns the people around them and that there is no reason to believe the right to end one’s life belongs solely to the individual (Mihaela, 2012, p. 480). Many believe that societies obligation to protect life outweighs ones right to die, such as in the Rodriguez case (“The fight for the right to die,” 2013). Some others believe that since life is a god given right, only god can choose to take it away and that the pain and suffering should be endured as it means the patients are sharing in Christ’s passion (Black, 1996, p. 723). Also, sometimes the patient may exorcise the right to receive euthanasia while not in a rational state or being fully committed to the act. The patient’s personal right to euthanasia can also be abused by a doctor or family member that wants to save money on health care costs, convincing a vulnerable, dying patient to seek euthanasia. The patient themselves may feel pressured and obligated to seek euthanasia even if they do not want to die if they believe the health care costs are hurting their family or if they believe that they are causing their family pain by slowly dying. Thus, the right to die should not lie with the individual.
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  • Fall '14
  • moulder
  • English, Crocker

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