There is also a similarity in the equitable outcome

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There is also a similarity in the equitable outcome in how the teachers should have handled their respective situations. Had both teachers had private conversations with the
students, they would have both realized the point of view of which these students were coming from and be able to avoid any future feelings of uncomfortableness or belittlement. Shapiro, J.P., and Stefkovich, J.A. (2011). Ethical Leadership and Decision Making in Education.New York: Routledge.Melissa Easley’s Response to Jennifer Hannah'sEven though our case studies discuss different aspects of race and culture, I found severalsimilarities. I feel the main similarity comes from the equitable outcome that we both thought could happen. Both situations required the teachers to take a step back and rethink how they handled the situation. In my case study, No time for stories, Ms. Ward did not take the time to understand Dequan’s point of view and could have handled it better, but a simple conversation. In your case, Ms. Lawson should have had a conversation with each of the boys to discover their point of view and give validation to their thoughts and feelings. I agree that this story meets the ethical paradigm for the profession, but I also think it has aspects of the ethic of justice. The ethical paradigm of justice means that “every parent, teacher, student, administrator, and another member of the school community must be treated with the same equality, dignity, and fair play” (Shapiro and Stefkovich, 2011 p.12). I think this case story relates to being treated with dignity. Showing the students that speaking in derogatory terms is not acceptable and that all students need to be treated with dignity. Shapiro, J.P., and Stefkovich, J.A. (2011). Ethical Leadership and Decision Making in Education.New York: Routledge.

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