Deductive reasoning and sample b is under inductive

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deductive reasoning and sample B is under inductive reasoning, then you are right! Let’s differentiatethen deductive from inductive reasoning.Deductive reasoningis when you arrive at a conclusion based on a general idea that leads toa more specific idea. For example in Sample A, the main idea implied in the premises is that, there is
a need to reduce air pollution ( general idea) and it leads to the specific idea that to reduce pollution,smoking must be banned in University A. On the other hand,inductive reasoningis when you lookat specific details and use them as bases of your conclusion. For instance in sample B, the specificdetails given are: leading companies hire many University A students, and established highereducation accept them. These two specific details will lead you to the general conclusion (idea) thatUniversity A produces top quality graduates.In short, deductive reasoning is from general to specific while inductive reasoning is fromspecific to general. Take note, you have to be very keen in identifying whether an argument ispresented through deductive reasoning or inductive reasoning. You have to evaluate well the givenpremises and conclusion.Moving on, you can use the three types of rhetorical appeals or Aristotle’s modes of proof(Weida and Stolley 2013; McCormack, 2014) in expressing and defending your arguments:Logos(logical appeal) – uses deductive and/or inductive thinking in presenting your view,makes use of examples, consequences, and comparisons and contrasts, and uses academicor formal languageEthos(ethical appeal) – finds strength in the authority and credibility of the sources ofinformation, requires to present different sides of the argument and declare personal interest inthe issue,uses language that is suitable for a particular audiencePathos(emotional appeal) – involve audience by sharing specific narratives that can movethem, use of rhetorical questions and figurative language to catch attention and provoke insightabout an issue, use language that evokes strong feelingsWe can use the combination of logos, ethos, and pathos in developing arguments.Oftentimes, we confidently think that our arguments are strong enough to prove our point.However, we sometimes overlook the simple things that make our arguments faulty or erroneous. Wecall those faulty arguments or statements fallacies. Suarez (2018) definedfallaciesas the statementsthat reflect flaws and inconsistencies in your reasoning. In short, it involves weak reasoning in raisingarguments. Here are the different types of fallacies you might commit unknowingly:FALLACIESSources:/writingcenter/writingprocess/logicalfallacies1. Hasty generalizationMaking assumptions about a whole group or range of cases based on a sample that is inadequate(usually because it is atypical or too small).

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Term
Spring
Professor
REMA JOY

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