Now obviously this point in which the philosophers

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Now obviously this point in which the philosophers are agreed—the view that there is a real table,  whatever it’s nature may be—is vitally important, and it will be worthwhile to consider what reasons  there are for accepting this view before we go on to the further question as to the nature of the real  table. Our next chapter will be concerned with the reasons for supposing that there is a real table at  all. Before we go further it will be well to consider for a moment what it is that we have discovered so far. It has appeared that, if we take any common object of the sort that is supposed to be known by the  senses, what the senses immediately tell us is not the truth about the object as it is apart from us,  but only the truth about certain sense-data which, so far as we can see, depend upon the relations  between us and the object. Thus what we directly see and feel is merely ‘appearance’, which we  believe to be a sign of some ‘reality behind. But if the reality is not what appears, have we any  means of knowing whether there is any reality at all? And if so, have we any means of finding out  what it is like? Such questions are bewildering, and it is difficult to know that even the strangest hypotheses may  not be true. Thus our familiar table, which has roused but the slightest thoughts in us hitherto, has  become a problem full of surprising possibilities. The on thing we know about is that it is not what it  seems. Beyond this modest result, so far, we have the most complete liberty in conjecture. Leibniz  tells us it is a community of souls: Berkeley tells us it is an idea in the mind of God; sober science,  scarcely less wonderful, tells us it is the vast collection of electric charges in violent motion. Among these surprising possibilities, doubt suggests that perhaps there is no table at all.  Philosophy, if it cannot answer so many questions as we could wish, has at least the power of  asking questions which increase the interest of the world, and show the strangeness and wonder  lying just below the surface even in the commonest things of daily life.   1.44 SUMMARY what the senses immediately tell us is not the truth about the object, it is merely appearance  recognized as reality” Cahn, 2012 “Human ability to distinguish between appearance and reality is the beginning of attainment of  genuine knowledge and living of an examined and pragmatic life.” T. Namwambah
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    NOTE  Conventionality is not morality. Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail  the last. To pluck the mask from the face of the Pharisee, is not to lift an impious hand to the Crown 
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