2011-12-15_015726_the_kite_runner_analysis

Now babas greatest fear has come to pass and the

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even understand… God help us all if Afghanistan ever falls into their hands”. Now, Baba’s greatest fear has come to pass, and the country is run by Islamic fundamentalists who make up the Taliban. In the Kite Runner, the violence and sadism of the Taliban is epitomized in the character of Assef. When Amir finally locates Hassan’s son, he has been taken from the orphanage by the Taliban and is being abused and tortured by Assef, Hassan’s childhood rapist. Assef is a brutal sadist who justifies his violence with the religious doctrines of the Taliban. Amir goes to see him and has to endure his description of the Taliban’s door-to-door killing of Hazara civilians in Mazar in 1998: “you don’t know the meaning of the word “liberating” until you have done that, stood in a roomful of targets, let the bullets fly, free of guilt and remorse, knowing you are virtuous, good, and decent. Knowing you are doing God’s work. It’s breathtaking”. Assef remembers Amir from their childhood in Kabul. He decides to fight Amir and release him afterward only if he survives the beating. Amir nearly dies during the fight, but he is finally freed from his lifelong guilt: I don’t know at what point I started laughing, but I did. It hurt to laugh, hurt my jaws, my ribs, my throat…. The harder I laughed, the harder he kicked me, punched me, scratched me. “WHAT’S SO FUNNY?” Asset kept roaring with each blow….What was so funny was that, for the first time since the winter of 1975, I felt at peace…. My body was broken – just how badly I wouldn’t find out until later – but I felt healed. Healed at last. I laughed.
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THE KITE RUNNER 11 In the end, Amir escapes with his life and Hassan’s son, his conscious finally wiped clean by the trials he undergoes in his native country on behalf of Hassan and his family. Amir returns to the United States with Sohrab, who is scared and traumatized by the violence and abuse that have marked his young life. When they first arrive, Sohrab does not speak. The novel’s final scene mirrors the beginning, in which Amir and Hassan are flying kites, their innocence still intact and uncompromised. Now, Amir is flying a kite with Hassan through his son, who emerges as a vital connection to the homeland Amir has left behind: “I heard a crow cawing somewhere and I looked up. The park shimmered with snow so fresh, so dazzling white, it burned my eyes… I smelled turnip qurma now. Dried mulberries, Sour oranges, Sawdust and walnuts… then far away, across the stillness, a voice calling us home, the voice of a man who dragged his right leg”. Despite the losses that have touched the characters’ lives, Hosseini is able to summon a hopeful note in the connection and reconciliation that conclude his novel. References Hosseini, K., (2007), The Kite Runner. Retrieved from EBSCOhost, online dataase.
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