Next position the monitor so the partner moving the

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the wood and make sure that they have clear space for at least 2 meters behind them. Next position the monitor so the partner moving the block of wood can be easily seen. The computer set up of Part I and II is to turn on the computer and connect the motion sensor’s stereo phone plugs to Digital channels 1 and 2 on the interface and then connect the yellow-tape plug to Digital Channel 1, and the other to Digital Channel 2. Next open the file MOT2_PLT or MOT1_PLT (depending on which part) on the Physics lab folder on the computer. The graph on each document is a display of Velocity (m) and time (sec.)
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Make sure everything is correct: delay being 3 seconds and sample rate being 5 Hz. When ready, one partner stands in front of the motion sensor with a block of wood about 0.4 meters away. The other partner clicks the “START” button to record data. The partner moving the block will need to watch the original graph and the line of their motion to try and make them match as best as they can (can take up to several tries). The upper graph of the screen is velocity vs. time plot and the bottom graph is position vs. time, which you can watch either one to help depending on which one is easier for the person moving to read and to match. After the partners decide while trial is the best then they can compare data by drawing a box around the desired area of your graph versus original graph and adding in a linear fit to see what the slope (acceleration), speed, and velocity is of the object. To find the percent error of part II we use the equation where a is expected acceleration in meters per seconds squared and a2 is actual acceleration in meters per seconds squared. Our percent error was: In order to get close to the same results of part I the student must start out about .4m away and stand still for 2 seconds then move back in a constant acceleration for four seconds for about .70 meters then stop at about 1.10 meters. The theory behind part III of the lab is when an objects free falls, it accelerated due to applied net force, but if air resistance is neglected and speed of object is measured in short consecutive intervals; the differences in speed of the object can be used to determine the acceleration due to gravity. The procedure for this pare of the experiment is one of the partners will drop a “picket fence” through a photogate. When the opaque band of the “”picket fence” is in view of the photogate the time from each blockage becomes increasingly shorter. Science Workshop program calculates the average speed of the picket fence from one opaque band by knowing the distance between the leading edge of each opaque band. It then calculates the average speed of picket fence from one band to the next. The graph is average speed versus time, which can give the acceleration due to gravity on a falling object. The computer setup of part III is to connect the photogate’s stereo phone plug to Digital Channel on the interface. Open P06_FALL document in the
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