This marked the end of any structured opposition from the Indians of the

This marked the end of any structured opposition from

This preview shows page 2 - 4 out of 4 pages.

tribes onto reservations and killing any resistant Native Americans. This marked the end of any structured opposition from the Indians of the Southern Plains. General Sheridan had used five groups of troops to enforce his policy and within a year the Comanche and Kiowa were defeated with no resistors left and the remaining Natives forced onto reservations. The Battle of the Little Bighorn, on June 25, 1876, was the result of the Cheyenne and Sioux tribes' outrage over the white settlers and Army continued refusal to leave their sacred Black Hill lands. The U.S. Army had organized 3 convoys of troops (one of which was General Custer's 7th Cavalry) to combat the two tribes that had left their reservations. They thought it would be an easy battle but the Army had underestimated the amount of Indian warriors; over 3000 had gathered to the Black Hills to attend the Sioux Sun Dance ceremony. Despite this General Custer and his 7th Cavalry decided to enter the Little Bighorn Valley alone. In a foolish
Image of page 2
Ackerman 3 attempt at glory, the general's impatience caused the death of all 243 men of the cavalry. Although this was a victory for the Native Americans (confirming the vision of a Sioux leader (Sitting Bull)), it also marked the beginning of the end for them. Custer's Last Stand angered the public who called for revenge over the massacre. With the American army's commitment to defeating the Indians, the surviving tribe members were permanently confined to reservations by 1890.
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 4 pages?

  • Spring '17
  • SCOTT
  • Native Americans in the United States, Cheyenne

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture