What is a negative feedback loop How does it differ from a positive feedback

What is a negative feedback loop how does it differ

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What is a negative feedback loop? How does it differ from a positive feedback loop? What are ionic bonds? What are covalent bonds? What are synthesis and decomposition reactions and the other terms which are used to describe these reactions?
A + B AB Anabolic reactions: joining amino acids into large protein molecules Decomposition Reaction/Catabolic: molecule broken down into smaller molecules AB A + B Exchange/Displacement: bonds are both made and broken AB + C AC + B and AB + CD AD + CB Oxidation Reduction: decomposition reactions, basiss of all reactions in which food fuels are broken down for energy, exchange reaction because electrons are exchanged. Electron donor: reactant losing the electrons becomes oxidized Electron acceptor: reactant taking up the transferred electrons becomes reduced What are acids? What do they produce when dissolved in water? Acids: substance that releases hydrogen ions in detectable amounts Proton donors When acids dissolve in water: release hydrogen ions (protons) and anions Concentration of the protons that determines the acidity of a solution Anions have little or no effect on acidity REMEMBER pH SCALE: 0-6 Acidic 7 Neutral 8-14 Increasingly Basic What are bases? What do they produce when they are dissolved in water? Bases: proton acceptors, take up hydrogen ions in detectable amounts What is neutralization? Neutralization: acids and bases mixed, react with each other in displacement reactions, form WATER and a SALT Joining of H+ and OH- to form water neutralizes the solution List the 4 organic compounds: Organic compound: distinguished by the fact that they contain carbon Inorganic compound: lack carbon 4 Organic Compounds: Carbohydrates: contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, solubility as a monosaccharide Larger the CHO molecule, less soluble it is in water
Monosaccharide: simple sugars, single-chain, single ring structures containing 3-7 carbon atoms, 1:2:1 ratio carbon, hydrogen, carbon Disaccharide: double sugar, two monosaccharides joined by dehydration synthesis water molecule is lost (lactose, maltose) too large to pass through membranes, must be digested to simple sugar to be absorbed into blood hydrolysis water molecule added to each bond, breaking bonds and releasing simple sugar units Polysaccharides: polymers of simple sugars linked together by dehydration synthesis Large, fairly insoluble, ideal storage products Starch: storage CHO formed by plants

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