Song and dance that drew heavily on angolan and

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Song and dance that drew heavily on Angolan and Congolese cultural  tradition o Closely associated with the ritualistic celebration of carnival A popular street festival that preceded the Lenten season of  self-sacrifice and created a safe public space for the lower  classes to challenge established social hierarchies, to mock the  customs, attitudes, dress, and beliefs of their social rivals o Lyrics raised social and political issues, often using clever word play,  double entendre and the juxtaposition of contrasting images to scorn  the arrogant power of the upper classes o Ernesto dos Santos (Dongo): recorded the first samba  Pelo Telefone Many-faceted movement for the renovation of Brazilian society and culture (p.  366) o February 1922: Modern Art Week in S ã o Paulo  Rejected the staid traditions of naturalism that had dominated  the late nineteenth century Brazilian art world, declared their  independence from old forms and content, and insisted upon  the need to develop indigenous Brazilian culture Key figures Heitor Villa-Lobos: nation’s premier samba artist
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Oswaldo de Andrade: proclaimed the need for “cultural  cannibalism,” the consumption of foreign artistic ideas to  be mixed with Brazil’s digestive enzymes thereby  producing an authentically Brazilian national cultural  identity that was neither xenophobic of nativist o March 1922: Brazilian Communist Party was founded at a congress in  Rio de Janeiro Began a struggle against the anarcho-syndicalist doctrines that  still dominated much of the small labor movement o July 1922:  Tenentes  (junior officers)   rose to prevent the seating of  Artur da Silva Bernardes who had been elected according to the  agreement between the states of S ã o Paulo and Minas Gerais Denounced the rule of the coffee oligarchy, political corruption,  and electoral fraud Added a need for economic development and social legislation,  including agrarian reform, minimum wage and maximum  working hours (p. 368) Lower-class mobilization in the 1920s (p. 368) o Blacks Black Brazilians in Salvador da Bahia joined Marcus Garvey’s  black power movement Others flocked to the practice of candomble, a popular religion  that evoked consciousness of the African past and created a  spiritual economic community of resistance to white supremacist  policies o Women 1922: women’s rights activist Berta Lutz organized the Brazilian 
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  • Spring '12
  • ThomasKlubock
  • Minas Gerais, Brazilian Communist Party, Brazilian Labor Confederation, Brazilian art world, indigenous Brazilian culture

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