64 Drugs to avoid Some drugs can bring on Parkinsons like symptoms and should

64 drugs to avoid some drugs can bring on parkinsons

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64 Drugs to avoid Some drugs can bring on Parkinson’s-like symptoms and should be avoided, unless they’re recommended by a specialist. These are some (but not all) of the drugs to avoid. Chlorpromazine (Largactil) 65 Fluphenazine (Modecate) 65 Perphenazine (Fentazin/ Triptafen) 65 Trifluoperazine (Stelazine) 65 21
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Flupenthixol (Fluanxol/Depixol) 65 Haloperidol (Serenace/Haldol) 65 Metoclopramide (Maxolon) 66 Prochlorperazine (Stemetil) 66 Domperidone (Motilium) is the anti-sickness drug of choice to prevent and treat nausea and vomiting caused by levodopa. 67 Domperidone can cause heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias) in some people over the age of 60. 68 If your client is taking this medication, you should inform your manager who can talk to their specialist, Parkinson’s nurse or pharmacist. You should also understand what the signs of irregular heart rhythms are. 68 These can include feeling faint, breathless or dizzy. 69 Other anti-sickness drugs that are generally considered useful include cyclizine (Valoid) 70 and 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists like ondansetron. 71 Find out more: see our booklet Drug treatments for Parkinson’s . Surgery Surgery doesn’t cure or slow down the progress of the condition, 72 but it can help some people control their symptoms. 1 The most common form of surgery is deep brain stimulation. 1 If your client has been through this procedure, you will need to be aware of how this works and how your client controls their symptoms. You may wish to talk about this with your client’s specialist or Parkinson’s nurse. Find out more: see our booklet Surgery and Parkinson’s. When levodopa wears off When levodopa is taken, a person’s Parkinson's symptoms will improve. 73 But these symptoms can sometimes return before the next dose of medication is due, causing a person's condition to fluctuate. This can be called ‘wearing off’. 1 In the early stages of Parkinson’s, someone with the condition may not notice when a dose of levodopa begins to wear off. But as Parkinson’s progresses, some people find that a dose doesn’t last as long as it used to. 74 These fluctuations can become even more unpredictable in advanced Parkinson’s. Sometimes the effects of wearing off happen quickly – this is called on/off. 13 Being ‘on’ describes when a person’s symptoms are controlled and they are feeling at their most capable. Being ‘off’ is when Parkinson’s symptoms return and are at their most debilitating. Some people have described this as like a light switch being turned on and off, or going up and down like a yo-yo. As well as having an effect on a person’s motor symptoms, people may also experience non-motor symptoms including sleepiness or low mood as their medication wears off. 10 ‘On/off’ is different from ‘freezing’. 75 There are different ways of managing freezing and ‘on/off’ swings, so they must be seen as separate problems. During ‘off’ periods a person will hardly be able to move at all, 1 so walking, going up stairs or reaching for a cup will be impossible. But when a person
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