When we refer to IT in this guide were talking about computer related fields

When we refer to it in this guide were talking about

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When we refer to IT in this guide, we’re talking about computer-related fields: hardware, software, and the people who create and support those products. Keep in mind, however, that just because IT is computer-related doesn’t mean jobs in the field are found only at computer-focused companies. In fact, the majority of IT services jobs today are in fields that have little to do with high tech. Financial services firms, universities, consult-ing firms, and the government are all major employers of IT professionals. What this means for you as a job seeker is that opportunities cross a wide variety of industries. This translates into more jobs available for IT specialists than for many other professionals. IT plays an integral role in asset management, com-munication, and branding in every field. An Oracle database can contain taxonomists’ species informa-tion (for example, a database of newts would contain all known species along with the history and habitat of each), bank records, or retail inventories. Email, instant messaging, and mailing lists allow people and companies to exchange information quickly. Corporate health-care policies are often a click away on the intranet, and that type of cheese you can find only in Wisconsin is available through a well-designed online order form. Today, IT facilitates the production, stor-age, and distribution of information, and growth in IT has mirrored the increase in pace and productivity in the global economy. IT is so entrenched in our daily lives that we’re often unaware of the job opportunities spread across industries. Schools use computers for online learning and as part of their curricula. In a world where students learn keyboarding in addition to writing and spelling, workers are needed in IT curriculum development and teaching. Nonprofits need people to build and main-tain websites, databases, and online donation systems. Businesses need people to build intranets, websites, and e-commerce sites. Schools, governments, and businesses invest in hardware and software, and in people to sup-port those systems. The worldwide credit crunch of 2007 and 2008 and the ensuing recession have affected prosperity across all sectors, and IT spending has not returned to prereces-sion levels. Forrester Research, a notable IT research firm, recently revised its forecast for frowth in U.S. IT spending (reflecting business and government IT operational budgets) from 6.4 percent to 5.2 percent in 2012. Less consumer spending hurts the job market, and while the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that some IT positions (such as database administra-tors) will likely continue to experience faster-than-aver-age growth, others (such as programmers) are expected to decline.Globally, the picture looks a little brighter, at least for the immediate future. Forrester projects that total global spending on technology goods, services, and staff will reach $1.69 trillion in 2011, with software taking the biggest chunk; Forrester also predicts 8.7 percent growth in 2012.
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