For example people that are so addiction to their phone lose the ability to

For example people that are so addiction to their

This preview shows page 6 - 9 out of 9 pages.

addicted by the internet but it also explains the negative aspect that attribute to addiction. For example, people that are so addiction to their phone lose the ability to focus on what is most important, a trait critical to the deep thought and problem solving needed for many jobs and other endeavors later in life. As Jane E. Brody, the personal health columnist for The New York Times, says, "There can be physical consequences, to. Children can develop pain in their fingers and wrists, narrowed blood vessels in their eyes (the long-term consequences of which are unknown), and neck and back pain from being slumped over their phones, tablets and computers."Quotes:Observations of people’s disconnection from the read world “prompted a New York psychotherapist to ask, “What really matters?”in life. In her enlightening new book, “The Power of Of,” Nancy Colierobserves that “we are spending far too much of our time doing things
Image of page 6
that don’t really matter to us.” Both in and outside her practice, she has encountered many people who have become “disconnected from what really matters, from what makes us feel nourished and groundedas human beings.”“The near-universal access to digital technology, starting at ever younger ages, is transforming modern society in ways that can have negative efects on physical and mental health, neurological development and personal relationships, not to mention safety on our roads and sidewalks.”“Don’t get me wrong. I’m no Luddite. I love technology. I love the convenience and assistance aforded by the myriad apps on my cell “Most people now check their smartphones 150 times per day, or every six minutes,” Ms. Colier wrote. “And young adults are now sending an average of 110 texts per day.” Furthermore, she added, “46 percent of smartphone users now say that their devices are something they ‘couldn’t live without.’”“But I also love putting my computer in sleep mode and going for a walk with my dog, meeting and chatting with friends, acquaintances and strangers, some of whom have become friends.”“Most people now check their smartphones 150 times per day, or every six minutes,” Ms. Colier wrote. “And young adults are now sending an average of 110 texts per day.” Furthermore, she added, “46 percent of smartphone users now say that their devices are something they ‘couldn’t live without.”Parent’s POV[1] Fisher, Mike. "The Internet Stole My Children." Journal of Holistic Healthcare, vol. 14, no. 1, Spring 2017, pp. 8-11. EBSCOhost, ?url=?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=124570951&site=ehost-live&scope=site.[2] In an Journal of Holistic Healthcare, a UK based journal focusing on evidence based practice and the practical implications of research in holistic health and social care, claims that, as human beings we love attention and from a parent, child relationship if this is component is lacking most children/teens will turn to the internet, specifically theirsmartphones..Mike Fisher: Founder and director, British Association of Anger Management
Image of page 7
Counselling and humanistic psychology. I founded the British Association of Anger Management
Image of page 8
Image of page 9

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 9 pages?

  • Winter '08
  • Bill

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture