With a number of these luther found grounds to

This preview shows page 5 - 6 out of 6 pages.

to the Lord’s Supper. However, if one element of Luther’s life is to be learned from his times of strife with other Christians it is this: continue to seek unity, despite the differences that separate us. Luther and Zwingli especially, though in disagreement on the Lord’s Supper, had a deep respect for each other and longed to find unity. Their insistence to stand on their convictions prevented it, but the key is that they were willing to try. This, I feel. Is greatly lacking in the American church.ConclusionAs one reads through Here I Stand, one cannot walk away thinking that Bainton has painted a biased picture of Martin Luther. Through his dedication to historical fact and his ability3
to weave that historicity with a compelling narrative, Bainton presents his readers with a work that is truly a joy to read, study, and learn from. Whether one finds commonality with Luther’s theology or not, one cannot deny the impact he had on the history of the church. Thankfully, Bainton paints that history in such a way that despite any theological differences, like Zwingli, the reader finds a great amount of respect for the former German monk.BibliographyBainton, Roland H. Here I Stand: A Life of Martin Luther (New York: Meridian, 1950).Kingdom, Robert M. “In Memoriam: Roland H. Bainton”, The Sixteenth Century Journal(XV, no.1 (Spring 1984): 105-106).Terrell, David G. Review of Here I Stand: A Life of Marton Luther, by Roland H. Bainton, -Scribd(accessed September 16, 2016).4

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture