However academic research studying gender quotas and politics as well as other

However academic research studying gender quotas and

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idea with a conscious intention to bring equality into the government. However, academic research studying gender quotas and politics as well as other perspectives from women themselves bring a new role into the true intentions and actual effects of a gender quote, specifically in politics. With the idea of an inherent bias rooted into our country as well as the effects a gender quota truly has on society, the addition of women in
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higher level positions in politics is more than just an addition of women for equal representation. An addition of women into politics brings a new type of perspective that could have effects on legislative government that in turn, affect society. The extent to the validity of this assertion and the true effects a woman really brings to the government changes the whole idea of a gender quota itself. Now not only impacting women held to a lower standard in the work place, but the actual laws that dictate a society, women gain a new power with this assertion in changing legislation. Understanding this new effect and perspective of a gender quota would allow for the real determination of its use as an actual idea in the United States, or a modified version that brings the positive out of the research discussed. The two ways in which women are mainly researched in terms of politics and legislation are their differences compared to men with regards to legislative ability and then the actual changing of legislation itself. These two primary ways will be discussed to frame the way an addition of women into high-level positions in the government changes societal laws and impacts women. The extent to which a woman is an advocate for all women will also be discussed to truly find how a quota impact legislation and society. During July of 2017, 13 Republican Senators, led by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and President Trump, proposed a plan to repeal Obamacare entirely without a replacement plan in place immediately, but a two-year deadline to come up with one. This plan was voted to move forward by all Senators except three- Republican Senators Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine (Huetteman). The three women’s no to their vote in the progression of the plan meant that McConnell’s plan would inevitably not move on for progression. Initially casted out of the drafting of the bill, all three women senators did not feel comfortable with allowing the American healthcare system have a time with an absent healthcare plan for all Americans. As Senator Collins explained "I do
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not think that it's constructive to repeal a law that is so interwoven within our healthcare system without having a replacement in place” (Huetteman). Senator Shelley Moore Capito writes that she rejected it because she did not come to Washington “to hurt people”. As she says in a statement “My position on this issue is driven by its impact on West Virginians” (Stein). Jeff Stein, reporter on politics and policy, calls their rejection and explanations an “extraordinary attack” through a positive connotation. He argues that as the 13 men Senators sought to propose
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