The first is to accept the premise that long term food security in the

The first is to accept the premise that long term

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The first is to accept the premise that long-term food security in the developing world cannot be accomplished solely via philanthropy or technology. Hence, the second ground rule is to accept that there will be no global food security without productivity increases among smallholders. The third ground rule is basically a corollary to the second: closing the yield gap between what is possible in the developed world and what is realized in the developing world without encouraging resource waste is the imperative. Private foundations, public entities, private public partnerships and NGOs are all helping create the capacity required to enable smallholder farmers to pursue sustainable intensification. As an example of the essential linkage of provision of improved resources with provision of required education, consider what can happen when smallholder farmers are provided with elite corn hybrids.
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Reading #13 Sustainability and the Needs of 2050 Agriculture Terry Stone Q&A 1. Make a case (speak in favor of) for technology with the goal of sustainability. In other words, defend both technology and how it can actually prove to be sustainable in the long run. Pretend you are on the board of Syngenta. Through the years, we have leaned on biotechnology to grow our crops in order to achieve sustainability. Food security is one of the biggest issues we are currently facing due to the continuous population growth. These technological advances help us grow crops more efficiently, at a much faster rate, which in turn help farmers produce more food to us consumers. Syngenta is a well known company that uses technology to aid farmers with their crops. With our help, farmers are able to produce more crops at a higher rate and provide a solution to the food security issue. Syngenta’s technologies promises to achieve sustainability and to put an end to the shortage of food and resources.
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What is Sustainable Agriculture February 16th 2018 Danna Razal Author Note SAREP UC Davis is a program that consist of members and experts that specialize in research and education in agricultural and food systems. They have extensive knowledge on biodiversity and agricultural practices that enhance the quality of life.
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Reading #14 What is Sustainable Agriculture SAREP UC Davis Notes Agriculture has changed dramatically, especially since the end of World War II. Food and fiber productivity soared due to new technologies, mechanization, increased chemical use, specialization and government policies that favored maximizing production. Prominent among these are topsoil depletion, groundwater contamination, the decline of family farms, continued neglect of the living and working conditions for farm laborers, increasing costs of production, and the disintegration of economic and social conditions in rural communities.
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