Amsterdam School Group of young architects who experimented with expressive

Amsterdam school group of young architects who

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Amsterdam School - Group of young architects who experimented with expressive brick architecture, largely on social housing projects after world war II.
Beurs ( Old Stock Exchange , Commodities Exchange) Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1897-1903 - Mixture of Neo-Gothic and avante-garde (Dutch expressionism) - Group of architects worked on it - Square grid design , axis are self-similar - Stock exchange building - Narrow window details, bell tower, - Two large stock trading halls surrounded by offices - Combination of negothic (brick) and industrialization (metal) on the inside - Won the competition with one design and changed it to this building - Open interiors - Stone piers with steel trusses Architect: Hendrik Petrus Berlage
German Expressionism - Art as an expressionist movement - It’s about the feeling, not being completely correct in proportion and view - Transforming physic states into art - Influenced by literature and poetry Artist: Vincent Van Gogh, The Nightcafe, 1888
Chilehaus, Hamburg, Germany, 1922-24 - International Trade between South America and Germany - Detail in brick - Neo-Gothic elements mixed with industrial materials (gargoyle engravings) - A house for organizing offices for trade (many windows) - Steam ship shape - Large office building - Brick expressionism Architect: Fritz Hoger
Bauhaus Manifesto, Weimar, 1919 - Started off with Neo-Gothic Wood cuts - Combination of apllied arts and crafts Architect: Walter Gropius
Theatre, German Werkbund Exhibition, Cologne, 1914 - Large audience hall - First exhibition for architects, craftsmen, artists - Organic sculptural theater - Steel trusses, brick and plaster Architect: Henry van de Velde
Glasshouse , Werkbund Exhibition, Cologne, 1914 - Exhibition pavilion for glass business - “Smurf pavillion” - Glass bricks and Steel Structure - Colored glass into the concrete - Glass waterfall, glass tiles - 2 story pavilion - pineapple shaped multi faceted polygonal design - 14 sided base - Glass treated metal staircase - 7 tiered cascading waterfall - Floor to ceiling colored mosaic walls Architect: Bruno Taut
Einstein Tower , Potsdam, 1920-22 - On a hill outside the city - About the expansion of the universe - Tower for a telescope, building is just a wrapper - Laboratory dedicated to “The Red Shift” - Made out of brick and then stuccoed over (wanted to be made out of concrete) - No concrete because of the war - Many drawings to control the curves of the buildings - Organic expression Architect: Erich Mendelsohn
Grose Schauspielhaus (Greate Theatre) Berlin, Germany, 1919-20 - 3,000 people can get into the building - For the working class - Columns of light, feel like you’re coming into a building with no weight (foyer) - Light Bulbs of different colors (theatre) - Cave-like interior in the theatre, looks like stalactites coming from columns and ceiling - Massive theatre hall - Honey-combed pendentive ornament Architect: Hans Poelzig
Modern Avantgardes De Stijl (Theo van Doesburg, Piet Mondrian)
De Stijl, Delft, Netherlands, 1917 - Depicting universal principles behind sensual perception not depicting what the senses see of nature.Painting the elements with horizontal/vertical lines using red yellow blue black white and grey.

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