Davids fall is a tragic moment He was so gifted He was given so much Ancient

Davids fall is a tragic moment he was so gifted he

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David’s fall is a tragic moment. He was so gifted. He wasgiven so much. Ancient Israel’s best chance of serving as a lightto the nations goes up in flames. The next few centuries are asad litany of one corrupt king following another (with pre-cious few exceptions). Rather than serving as just one unfor-tunate case, David’s act of taking becomes the norm. Samuelwas right—even the best king ends up taking and taking.David’s story is all too familiar. Power over others so oftenleads to corruption.David inspires fascination. He was a genuine humanbeing. He had powerful strengths, and he had deep flaws. Tosome degree, he is truly a hero. The final picture, though, isthat David’s way was a detour. Even if David himself had notfallen, a later king would have. The institution of kingship,that is, kingship like that of surrounding nations, kingship fo-cused around the power of the sword, results in brokenness,cynicism, and despair. The kind of world God wants, the kindof creativity, wholeness, liveliness characteristic of the king-dom of God simply cannot be established on the basis of abrute kind of power.We see this in a later passage, which refers to David. Isa-iah 9 refers to the house of David, but to a successor to Davidwho actually goes a different way altogether. The first Davidwas the greatest of Israel’s warriors. But under the leadershipof this new David, according to Isaiah 9, “all the boots of thetramping warriors and all the garments rolled in blood shallbe burned as fuel for the fire” (Isa. 9:5). The new David willlead God’s people in the ways of peace, not in the ways ofbrute power.This new David, Christians confess, is Jesus. Jesus is aprince, not of warfare as the first David, but the Prince of Peace.Rather than takingbeing at the root of his kingly activity, Jesusfocuses on giving. He gives mercy, respect, dignity. This is true64GOD S HEALING STRATEGY, REVISED EDITION
influenced him to worship other gods. “His wives turnedaway his heart after other gods; and his heart was not true tothe Lord his God” (1 Kings 11:4).God warns Solomon in 1 Kings 9:6-8, “If you turn asidefrom following me . . . and do not keep my commandments . . .but go and serve other gods and worship them, then I will cutIsrael off from the land . . . and the [temple] I will cast out ofmy sight. . . . This [temple] will become a heap of ruins.”This is indeed what happens. Solomon does turn asidefrom following God. “His wives turned away his heart afterother gods; and his heart was not true to the Lord his God” (1Kings 11:4). In time Israel is cut off from the land and the tem-ple becomes a heap of ruins.Solomon, like David, has many good characteristics. He isnot nearly as sensitive to God as David, however. In the end,he shows no sign of turning back to God’s ways. His prioritiesare worldly power and prestige.

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