Calciums effects on steel is that its not necessary used in an alloying element

Calciums effects on steel is that its not necessary

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Calcium’s effects on steel is that it’s not necessary used in an alloying element but more for an easier time during continuing casting and other applications that can be improved by adding this element to such molten steel. Phosphorus effects on steel is that it increases strength and hardness but at the expense of ductility at impact to toughness especially in high carbon steels that are quenched and tempered it strengthens low carbide steels to a degree and increases resistance to corrosion and prove machine ability and free cutting steels. Sulfur’s effects on steel improves the machine ability but lowers the transverse ductility and not impact toughness and has little effect on its longitudinal mechanical properties. Nitrogen’s effect on steel is that when added to an authentic steel it can simultaneously improve fatigue life strength work hardening rate where and localization to corrosion resistance.
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Oxygen’s effect on steel is that it causes impurities and oxidizes the material but is a byproduct from most heating processes. Hydrogen’s effects on steel is is also referred to is hydrogen in Burnell meant as a metals loss of ductility and reduction in loadbearing capability due to the exorbitant of hydrogen atoms or molecules by its metal the result of hydrogen embrittlement is at the component cracks and fractures at a stress less than the yield strength of the metal. Tin’s effects on steel is that is detrimental to the tensile properties of steel especially when examined through the notch impact test. Arsenic’s effect on steel is that it has a detrimental effect on the kinetics of the development of reversible temper embrittlement even after an annealing process.
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  • Winter '20
  • Tensile strength, Weld A287 Metallurgy, University of Anchorage Alaska

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