Acanthornis magna greeniana feeds on insects and

Info icon This preview shows pages 157–159. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Acanthornis magna greeniana feeds on insects and other invertebrates among bark, litter and foliage. It breeds from September to December, laying three white, lightly spotted eggs in a woven, domed nest. Current Status Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 : Critically Endangered Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 : endangered Plate 10. Acanthornis magna greeniana (Photograph: Parks & Wildlife Service) Figure 9. Acanthornis magna greeniana: King Island records King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 151
Image of page 157

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Existing Conservation Measures There are no existing conservation measures specifically for Acanthornis magna greeniana. Distribution and Habitat Acanthornis magna greeniana is found only on King Island where it occurs in wet forest and swamp forest, most recently only from Melaleuca ericifolia swamp forest with a well developed understorey (Donaghey 2003). Acanthornis magna greeniana may have formerly occurred across much of King Island, but appears to have undergone a significant reduction in range since European settlement (Garnett et al. 2011). Acanthornis magna greeniana was recorded at Yellow Rock, the Nook Swamp, Pass River and Pegarah State Forest in the late 1960s and early 1970s, but extensive searches in 2001, 2003–2004 and 2010–2011 indicates it now occurs at only two locations: Nook Swamps and Colliers Swamp (Figure 9 & Table 9). It is possible that a small population could persist in Pegarah State Forest, which is the largest remnant of native forest on King Island, and which is connected to Lavinia State Reserve by corridors of suitable habitat (Donaghey 2003). Around 90% of potential swamp forest habitat at Nook Swamp was burnt in a wildfire in 2007 (RMCD 2007). The observation of three Acanthornis magna greeniana in a single small patch of unburnt swamp forest at the northern extremity of Nook Swamps indicates that some individuals survived the fire in unburnt patches of habitat. However, the fire is likely to result in the medium- to long-term loss of a significant area of remaining habitat for Acanthornis magna greeniana on the island. Populations The population size of Acanthornis magna greeniana is estimated to consist of 50 or fewer mature individuals (Garnett et al. 2011). Two subpopulations are currently known, at Nook Swamps and Colliers Swamp (Table 9). The small size of the Acanthornis magna greeniana population makes all surviving subpopulations crucial to the long-term survival of the subspecies. Habitat critical to the survival of the species Habitat critical for the survival of Acanthornis magna greeniana on King Island includes the sites with known subpopulations (Nook Swamps and Colliers Swamp), and all patches of wet sclerophyll forest and swamp forest. Reservation Status Acanthornis magna greeniana is reserved within Lavinia State Reserve and Colliers Swamp Conservation Area.
Image of page 158
Image of page 159
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern