Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening Whose woods these are I think I know His

Stopping by woods on a snowy evening whose woods

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here To watch his woods fill up with snow. My little horse must think it queer To stop without a farmhouse near Between the woods and frozen lake The darkest evening of the year. He gives his harness bells a shake To ask if there is some mistake. The only other sound's the sweep Of easy wind and downy flake. The woods are lovely, dark, and deep. But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep.
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Poem Analysis This poem represents the feeilng of a nomadic soul during this time. Many Americans tended to wander and take small journeys in order to walk away from their problems they were having at the moment. Sometimes they were journeys taken for self-discovery, and sometimes they were made to keep promises. As mentioned in the poem, these journeys were usual tiring and long. This is seen when Frost states  "The woods are lovely, dark, and deep. But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep."
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  • Fall '18
  • Woods, International Marxist Tendency, Carl Sandburg

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