The structure of the stories and vignettes display a

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The structure of the stories and vignettes display a lot about Nick’s psychological
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37 Jung condition, especially post-war. It shows how his experiences as a young boy affected his view on life as he grew older. Jacqueline Brogan takes a more different approach when analyzing Nick and In Our Time . She sees Hemingway’s novel as having more of a cubist anatomy. A cubist novel can be defined as having different stories, taken from different angles that all contribute to one larger picture at the end. Brogan, in quoting another author says, “ In Our Time ‘s alteration of the named short stories with the untitled chapters …corresponds to what Frye here calls “anatomy” (Brogan 31). Rather than this novel being one large story as Moddelmog suggests, In Our Time is in fact a collection of smaller stories put together. Furthering her argument on the novel’s structure, Brogan also rejects the idea of Nick Adams being the author of his own stories. She believes that making some of the vignettes actual stories and inserting a new introduction, makes it impossible for “Nick Adams to be the implied author” (Brogan 31). Brogan argues that there was a reason for Hemingway to edit and republish the same novel multiple times. If Nick Adams were truly the author of the novel, there would be no need for a new version of the book. One of the largest pieces of evidence that Brogan provides is how there are two different styles of writing present in the last story of the novel: one representing the thoughts of Nick and the other being the writing of Hemingway. In “The Big Two-Hearted River” we are presented with a character that has just gotten back from war and is trying to regain his sense of a normal life. Hemingway’s writing clearly depicts this as he creates a character that “cannot...will not think past the most simple of sentences” (Brogan 39). Most of the sentences describing Nick’s inner thoughts are short sentences, “He has not been unhappy all day. This was different though. Now things were done” (Hemingway
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38 139). This is contrasted against Hemingway’s writing, which is filled with “style, flourishing his ability to write imaginatively, with depth” (Brogan 39). In Hemingway’s description of Nick’s routine when he is at camp, he uses a lot of descriptive words and his sentences are much longer. This is more practical evidence of how Nick cannot be the writer of the stories because there are two different styles of writing present. Aside from this cubist structure, Brogan suggests that the way Hemingway put his novel together shows the realities of “our time” and how we see our world. She states, “ In Our Time presents us with a violent world, full of emotional and physical abuses…on a global scale that seem disturbingly altogether too much part of our actual time” (Brogan 44). She thinks that Hemingway’s message goes far beyond the characters and is more applicable and appealing to the way the world actually is.
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39 Jung Hi Linda, For the most part, I think this is a really good start, a very interesting beginning. You’ve
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