II P ITTSBURGH S C URRENT EMISSION PROFILE Pennsylvania is the third largest

Ii p ittsburgh s c urrent emission profile

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II. P ITTSBURGH S C URRENT E MISSION P ROFILE Pennsylvania is the third-largest emitter of CO 2 in the country [2]. With approximately 200 major electricity generation facilities, the Commonwealth ranks second in the nation in electricity generation, fourth in coal production, and second in both nuclear and natural gas production [2]. As the No. 1 state in in the United States for electricity exports, electricity generation in Pennsylvania has impacts on neighboring states and beyond. Pennsylvania thus far has seen a reduction in its overall carbon footprint, which can be credited largely to retiring coal-generating plants in favor of natural-gas fired power plants. In 2005, Pennsylvania was responsible for nearly 281.1 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions- in 2015, the state emitted 233.2 million metric tons; this represents a nearly 16% reduction. Although market conditions alone may get us close to Pennsylvania’s target under the Clean Pow er Plan of a 27% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, there is considerable room to be made for achieving our decarbonization targets of an 80% reduction by 2050 and 100 percent soon thereafter (which is needed to avoid the catastrophic impacts of climate change and extreme weather events) [3]. In order to achieve this, Pennsylvanians will need to come together to identify the appropriate range of infrastructure changes, financial funding, and overall policy mechanisms that are needed to support Pennsylvania’s sustainable economic development. Since the removal of the Clean Power Plan and its accompanying planning resources, many states are now turning internally to identify how to best reconcile their economic paths of development with their overall energy needs. The State of Pennsylvania is particularly conscious of its leadership in the nation’s overall energy discussions and is currently in the process of planning how to combine economic, energy, and environmental policy in ways that will best serve its citizens. At the same time, although mitigation goals have been formed under the Conference of the Parties as a forum for countries to agree on their long-term contributions to carbon reductions, there is currently no existing globally- agreed forum where cities and states can officially understand how they can best contribute to long-term emissions reductions through infrastructure decisions now. In an era of constant regulatory fluctuation, taking effective decisions at the local level can better contribute to the long-term challenges of sustainability [1]. The City of Pittsburgh recently drafted Climate Action Plan 3.0, yet without a state nor nation-wide agreed upon goal for long-term energy decarbonization. Pittsburgh as a city is embarking down a sustainable path for development unseen before in the US, if ever globally. Pittsburgh is truly choosing and displaying leadership in energy development in that it is a city, yet is choosing to define its development path as a nation traditionally would. If Pittsburgh can clearly understand and
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  • Summer '20
  • Dr joseph
  • Renewable Energy, World energy resources and consumption

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