Pathophysiology of Stroke 11_19_12

Magnetic resonance imaging mri reveals areas of

Info iconThis preview shows pages 22–30. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Reveals areas of ischemia earlier than CT scan 1. Fagan SC, Hess DC. Stroke. In: DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors. Pharmacotherapy a pathophysiologic approach. 8th ed. New York: McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:353-356. 2. Image (left): Brunicardi FC, Andersen DK, Billiar TR, et al. Schwartz’s Principles of Surgery, 9th Edition : http://accessmedicine.com. [Accessed 30 Oct 2012]. 3. Image (right): Usatine RP, Smith MA, Mayeaux EJ Jr, et al. The Color Atlas of Family Medicine: www.accessmedicine.com [Accessed 30
Background image of page 22

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Other Diagnostic Tests Carotid Doppler (CD) Determine degree of stenosis in carotid arteries Electrocardiogram (ECG) Detect presence of atrial fibrillation Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) Identify valve abnormalities or wall-motion abnormalities that could be sources of emboli to the brain Fagan SC, Hess DC. Stroke. In: DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors. Pharmacotherapy a pathophysiologic approach. 8th ed. New York: McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:353-356.
Background image of page 23
NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) Neurologic exam used to evaluate the effects of acute cerebral infarction Level of consciousness, orientation questions, response to commands Visual-field loss Facial movements Motor strength, limb ataxia Sensory loss Language, articulation Adams HP et al. Guidelines for the Early Management of Adults with Ischemic Stroke. Stroke 2007;38:1655-1711.
Background image of page 24

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hemorrhagic Stroke: Definitions & Etiology Fagan SC, Hess DC. Stroke. In: DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors. Pharmacotherapy a pathophysiologic approach. 8th ed. New York: McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:353-356.
Background image of page 25
Pathophysiology of Hemorrhagic Stroke Presence of blood in brain parenchyma damages surrounding tissue through mass effect and neurotoxicity of blood components Hemorrhage volume is the most important predictor of outcome 30% continue to enlarge over first 24 hours Volume > 60 mL associated with 71-93% mortality at 30 days Most early mortality due to abrupt increase Fagan SC, Hess DC. Stroke. In: DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors. Pharmacotherapy a pathophysiologic approach. 8th ed. New York: McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:353-356.
Background image of page 26

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Case Chief complaint: “can barely speak and has weakness in her right arm that made her drop her glass of orange juice” HPI: JL is a 74 year-old female presenting to the ED with her husband. Her husband explained that all of a sudden she started experiencing weakness in the right side of her body and he noticed a right-sided facial droop.
Background image of page 27
Case PMH: hypertension, atrial fibrillation, hyperlipidemia FH: not significant SH: + tobacco, occasional alcohol use Allergies: NKDA Medications: Hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg daily Lisinopril 10 mg daily
Background image of page 28

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
What risk factors does JL have for ischemic stroke?
Background image of page 29
Image of page 30
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page22 / 33

Magnetic resonance imaging MRI Reveals areas of ischemia...

This preview shows document pages 22 - 30. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online