This begins with addressing the potential barriers that may limit the rate of

This begins with addressing the potential barriers

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implementation of this process. This begins with addressing the potential barriers that may limit the rate of uptake in hospitals. One major barrier to the adoption of evidence-based practice is insufficient education on the latest techniques in nursing care. Nurses have a way of carrying out their day to day procedures. Getting them to change their methods may be difficult to start with. One may need to set up the necessary training avenues to ensure that they adopt the recommended guidelines. The second barrier is time constraints. Nurses are often very busy while in hospital. Long shifts coupled with a large patient population gives little time to engage in continuous nursing education. Even if they are open to learning about newer ways to improve their skills, enough time needs to be created to facilitate the learning. The respective hospital managers should invest in the necessary infrastructure that will allow nurses to access the latest nursing research. This includes computers, stable internet access and subscriptions to recommended nursing journals. This is the first step in making sure that the employees have access to information. Afterwards, it is paramount to set up basic training sessions that will help to put the new recommendations into practice. Well trained personnel are more likely to adopt the evidence-based practices. Hospital administrators should take evidence-based practices into account when developing nursing shifts. This involves creating time periods whereby employees can learn. This ensures that there is effective time management by allowing learning without compromising patient care. In long term, these two solutions will improve the adoption of evidence-based practice. Reference
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Black, A. T., Balneaves, L. G., Garossino, C., Puyat, J. H., & Qian, H. (2015). Promoting evidence-based practice through a research training program for point-of-care clinicians. The Journal of nursing administration, 45(1), 14–20. doi:10.1097/NNA.0000000000000151
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  • Winter '18
  • Tammy Gray
  • Nursing, The Journal of Nursing

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