H will not be forgotten thus never forgetting his beauty or the love between

H will not be forgotten thus never forgetting his

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W.H. will not be forgotten, thus never forgetting his beauty or the love between the two. However, many other elements are used to convey this theme. Figures of Speech Shakespeare utilizes figures of speech in his sonnet such as metaphors. The entire poem is a metaphor. For example, he starts off by saying, “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” (Shakespeare, line 1). This signifies to the reader that Shakespeare is going to be comparing someone to a summer’s day in the lines following it. He begins the metaphor in the next line by writing, “Thou art more lovely and temperate;” (Shakespeare, line 2). By using this metaphor, he can describe this young man he loves as warm and comforting, displaying affection. By comparing W.H. to a summer’s day, the poet can articulate his emotion and feelings, allowing the audience to comprehend just how wonderful of a person this young man once was. Because the readers can know just enough, W.H.’s beauty lives on, as well as the love
Cauley 3 between the two. Besides using a metaphor, Shakespeare also uses personification. Shakespeare uses personification in his sonnet. He uses personification to help describe what a summer’s day exactly is. He uses personification in line three by saying “Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May.” Wind cannot literally shake things; it is just wind. By saying this, readers can visualize winds causing flowers to move along with it on a not so beautiful day, causing the audience to think of something negative. This then makes W.H.’s beauty to seem brighter in contrast to such a gloomy day. The usage of personification seems insignificant; however, it still contributes in making the theme.

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