A study done on foster fathering can draw

Info icon This preview shows pages 11–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A study done on foster fathering can draw similarities between foster and adoptive parenting. Many of the same factors go into deciding and acting as a foster father and an adoptive father. There is a kind of motivation, most likely the desire to be a father. There is how the foster father acts to the child. Most foster fathers report that they feel no difference between legal and foster parenting in regards to the child. They feel that the child is their for the time that they have them. Both need to provide the child with a healthy father/child relationship. They know that the child wants to belong somewhere. The differences between this study and the adoptive father perspectives from the blog and other studies is that foster fathers tend not to like the birth families of the children. There is a reason they have been removed from their home and the foster families like to blame the birth families. Adoptive parents, generally those in open adoptions, have a good relationship with the birth parents. Todd expresses many of the same beliefs as the foster fathers, up until the attitudes towards the birth parents. Many of the studies surrounding adoptees were related to adjustment and psychological issues later in life. One study that took place in Sweden and compared national adoptees, international adoptees, siblings of each category and the general population, found that suicide attempts were two to three times more likely in adoptees than in non-adopted children. There was a marginal difference in gender, with women being slightly more likely to attempt suicide than men (von Borczyskowski, 2006). Another study from Sweden looked at educational attainment. This study contained only men and found that young men who had been adopted performed lower than average on intelligence tests. Previous studies have found what they call an “adoption decalage”, or a gap between cognitive ability and performance (Dalen, 2008). In the US, there are higher rates of poor performance from adoptees in
Image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Hidden Voices 12 higher socio-economic class families perhaps because of a higher standard for achievement. Another study looked at similar adjustment behaviors. This study found that female adoptees tend to report better grades, fewer learning problems, higher academic achievements, and lower delinquency than male adoptees. However, male adoptees reported better self-worth than female adoptees did. In a study that looked at several different kinds of psychological adjustments, gender and whether the participant had searched for their birth parents were compared. Male adoptee who had searched for their birth parents (Searchers) were shown to have less anger than male adoptees who had not searched (Nonsearchers). Male Searchers ad higher scores on the stress test than Nonsearchers. Nonsearchers and those who had been reunited with their birth parents had lower depression scores than Searchers.
Image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern