The pathophysiology of pyelonephritis is microorganisms such as E coli Proteus

The pathophysiology of pyelonephritis is

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The pathophysiology of pyelonephritis is microorganisms such as E. coli, Proteus, or Pseudomonas turn urea into ammonia, thus increasing the alkaline of the urine which causes a greater risk for stone formation (Huether & McCance, 2017). The infection is spread by ascending microorganisms along the ureter and causes renal inflammation, renal edema, and purulent urine from the medullary infiltration of white blood cells (Huether & McCance, 2017). Similarities and Differences A similarity is with both types of UTI’s; they contain some of the same bacteria; P- fimbriae (pyelonephritis-associated fimbriae) that bind to the uroepithelium of individuals with P blood group antigen and readily ascend the urinary tract (Huether & McCance, 2017). Another
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similarity is the symptoms of an UTI, which are burning, frequent, and painful urination (Huether & McCance, 2017). The difference is the location of where the UTI’s occur. In cystitis, there is inflammation of the bladder (lower urinary tract), and with pyelonephritis, there is
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