Himself as a king the sights and sounds of his native

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Introduction to Learning and Behavior
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 22
Introduction to Learning and Behavior
Honey/Powell
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himself as a king. The sights and sounds of his native land and the free life he had once led among his people are vividly recalled by the slave. ‘The Slave’s Dream’ portrays the lost dreams and ambitions of a slave. The slave is captivated by the images of his family and native land. Holding his sickle in hand, the slave lies in the field, bare-breasted, his matted hair covered by sand. Along the stretch of scenery of his dreams, the river Niger flows regally. He imagines himself to be a king, no more bound to the shackles of slavery, but free to do whatever he wishes. He strides majestically over the plains lined by palm trees. The slave is so empowered by his dream, that he visualizes himself in a land where he is an individual not just a slave. The images of his family bring a tear to his eye. Like a king he rides his stallion in search of adventures. The lion’s roar, the hyena’s scream and the grunt of the hippopotamus sound like a glorious roll of drums to his ears. The sound from the forest and the desert introduces ideas of wildness and liberty in his mind. As he finally gasps for his last breath, he smiles in ‘tempestuous glee’. The recollections are so strong that his abject slavery and shameful death hardly trouble him. ‘The Slaves Dream’ is celebration of liberty and dignity. No master can deprive his slave of his liberty to dream. As the driver whips the slave, as the sun beats heavily on his body, the slave lies motionless as his soul has broken away from the fetters of his body. Death illumines his land of sleep as death has saved him from the miseries of life.
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Introduction to Learning and Behavior
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 22
Introduction to Learning and Behavior
Honey/Powell
Expert Verified
School of Distance Education Self-check questions: 1. Who is the sleeper referred to in the following lines? Why does he weep?
Reading Literature in English 23
2. How does the poet describe the slave waiting for his death? 3. How does the slave die as a free man? 4. What special use of words do you see in this poem?
Paragraph: What are the rosy dreams of the slave, as painted by the poet?

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