VTP domain defines a set of interconnected switches sharing the same VTP

Vtp domain defines a set of interconnected switches

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VTP domain defines a set of interconnected switches sharing the same VTP configuration.
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Chapter 2 40 © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public VTP Modes Mode Description Client Cannot create, change, or delete VLANs on command-line interface (CLI). Forwards advertisements to other switches. Synchronizes VLAN configuration with latest information received from other switches in the management domain. Does not save VLAN configuration in nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM). Server Can create, modify, and delete VLANs. Sends and forwards advertisements to other switches. Synchronizes VLAN configuration with latest information received from other switches in the management domain. Saves VLAN configuration in NVRAM. Transparent Can create, modify, and delete VLANs only on the local switch. Forwards VTP advertisements received from other switches in the same management domain. Does not synchronize its VLAN configuration with information received from other switches in the management domain. Saves VLAN configuration in NVRAM.
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Chapter 2 41 © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public VTP Operation
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Chapter 2 42 © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public VTP Pruning VTP pruning prevents flooded traffic from propagating to switches that do not have members in specific VLANs. VTP pruning uses VLAN advertisements to determine when a trunk connection is flooding traffic needlessly. Switches 1 and 4 in the figure support ports statically configured in the Red VLAN. The broadcast traffic from Station A is not forwarded to Switches 3, 5, and 6 because traffic for the Red VLAN has been pruned on the links indicated on Switches 2 and 4.
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Chapter 2 43 © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public VTP Versions Three VTP versions: V1, V2, V3. Versions are not interoperable (e.g., V2 supports token ring VLANs but V1 does not). Unrecognized Type-Length-Value (TLV) configuration changes are propagated by V2 servers and clients and these unrecognized TLVs can be stored in NVRAM. V1 transparent switches inspect VTP messages for the domain name and version and forward a message only if the version and domain name match. V2 transparent switches forward VTP messages in transparent mode without checking versions. V2 performs VLAN consistency checks (VLAN names and values) only when you enter new information through the CLI or via SNMP. V2 does not perform checks when new information is obtained from a VTP message or when information is read from NVRAM. If the MD5 hash on a received VTP message is correct, V2 accepts the VTP message information.
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Chapter 2 44 © 2007 – 2010, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public VTP Version 1 and 2 Version-dependent transparent mode VTP Version 1, a VTP transparent network device inspects VTP messages for the domain name and version VTP Version 2 forwards VTP messages in transparent mode, without checking the version.
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