Pitfall team member have tried the solution it doesnt

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Pitfall: Team member have tried the solution. It doesn’t work, so they want to give up . Recommen- dation: Start small and realize it doesn’t need to be perfect. There are always changes that will need to be made along the way. Take the team through a brainstorming session by asking the following question: “What went well?” “What didn’t work?” “What do we need to change?” Always start with the pos- itive to help team members realize that they’re making progress. Study During this step, the team will evaluate the tryouts and review peer feedback. Team members will compare data with previous find- ings. They may make changes to the process or decide they can move forward to a full implementation. Pitfall: The measurement system doesn’t measure the change. Rec- ommendation: Unfortunately, this issue can happen in the best of circumstances. Try to prevent this from happening by checking the measurement system during the planning step. If the team uses software, such as a patient-tracking system, it’s important to validate the patient-tracking data by com- parison with actual observations. The team may need to collect more data or survey more staff with different questions. Pitfall: The team and staff are uncomfortable with full implemen- tation. Recommendation: You’ll need to find out the cause of the concern. This can be accomplished with a brainstorming session by asking, “What are the barriers that are pre- venting full implementation?” After these thoughts are written on the flip chart, ask, “What’s the plan of action to eliminate the barriers?” Act In the final step, the team decides to move the full implementation forward. The implementation plan is communicated to all staff mem- bers who’ll be affected. The plan of action and implementation are completed. Pitfall: The change wasn’t sus- tained. Recommendation: In health- care, there’s a tendency to stop at implementation. We make the assumption that after a change is implemented, we can move onto the next project. We don’t take into consideration human nature. Change can only succeed if the peo- ple who do the work feel that the improvement is better than what they were doing before the change, and they have the confidence to carry it out. Meet with the team the first week after implementation or sooner if necessary. These meetings shouldn’t take more than 30 to 60 minutes and can decrease in time and/or frequency as the team feels more confident. The three agenda items should be: “What went well?” “What didn’t work?” “What do we need to change?” Asking for the positive first helps team members realize how much they were able to accomplish.
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