Although the reasoning behind defensive medicine is rational it is also costly

Although the reasoning behind defensive medicine is

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defensive medicine do so because they feel it may lessen their chances of being sued. Although the reasoning behind defensive medicine is rational, it is also costly, and often clinically unnecessary (Kane, 2013). Physicians who find themselves being sued have one characteristic in common, their failure to communicate effectively with the patient. This character flaw can be the reason physicians are hit with medical malpractice lawsuits. Physicians push for reform and for the law makers to make it harder for patients to sue, however there can be several strategies implemented that may help doctors reduce their risk. One strategy is to encourage doctors to get along better with their patients. Doctors can improve patient relationships by being honest about medical errors, build rapport, use humor, and spend time educating patients about their care.
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6 Conclusion In conclusion, ethics plays a large role in how the physician, hospital or health care professional responds to medical malpractice. At times despite the best effort of treatment given things happen and no one is at fault. But there are those times when physicians are momentarily negligent which causes harm to the patient. The ethical part of these situations is when the physician and the hospital will work with the patient, the family and/or the insurance company to compensate them for their damages without having to engage in a legal dispute. This unfortunately does not happen in many cases as the physician or hospital do not want to admit fault which can not only affect future patients care but also public relations, financial resources and the overall success of the organization.
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7 References Harris, D.M. (2014). Contemporary issues in healthcare law & ethics (4 th ed.). Chicago, IL: Health Administration Press. Rosenbaum, S. (2011). The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: Implications for Public Health Policy and Practice. Public Health Reports , 126 (1), 130–135. Kane, L. (2013, July). Top 10 Specialties Sued: 2013 Malpractice Report. Physicians Weekly , (). The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologist Women’s Health Care Physicians. (2016). Disclosure and Discussion of Adverse Events. Retrieved from: - Patient-Safety-and-Quality-Improvement/Disclosure-and-Discussion-of-Adverse-Events
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  • Health care provider, health care reform, Medical malpractice

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