Great posts everyone prof davis new re guiding

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Great posts everyone! -Prof. Davis New! Re: GUIDING QUESTION# 1: When the Civil War began, what was Abraham Lincoln's primary objective? Glenn Dorsey (Apr 14, 2014 5:10 AM) - Read by: 3
At the beginning of the war, President Lincoln made it clear that the purpose was to save the union. He actually responded on a couple occasions the adamantly proclaim that his concern was the saving of the union and that he could care less about slavery as it pertained to the country though his personal beliefs may have varied. His position was further established when he offered the Confederate state the option to keep their slaves if they simply returned to the Union. His position was that he was indifferent on the slavery issue. As the war continued, he came to the realization that the war was a losing battle for the North if the cause wasn’t about the emancipation of the slaves. Slave labor was like the strength of the south as it gave them many advantages and President Lincoln was wise and bold enough to take this option away. The union was losing many of the battles early on and it seemed that the South ceding from the Union was imminent. Lincoln wanted to win the war but also knew that to his moves had to be calculated and prudent so that he would not lose the support of the slave holding states that hadn’t left the union. After the Union and won a won a decisive battle, President Lincoln signed a delayed emancipation proclamation which freed slaves after January 1st, 1863 in the States that not returned to the Union. This once again enforced his stance on saving the Union. By methodically presenting this legislature, he slowly started to shift the purpose of the war from solely being about saving to Union to being about the removal of the slavery institution in the United States. He didn’t really believe the South would take the bait and they didn’t. They didn’t even acknowledge President Lincoln’s order and subsequently did not free their slaves. In reality, the slaves weren’t being freed but considered contrabands since the confederate states were at war with the union. As long as they were at war, all property seized by the Union forces became that of the Union, to include slaves. References Hine, Darlene C., Hine William C. & Harrold, Stanley. The African-American Odyssey, Volume 1 (5th Ed.). Pearson Education. 2011

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