Dvt in postoperative and bedridden patients and

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Chapter 4 / Exercise 11
Health Economics and Policy
Henderson
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(DVT) in postoperative and bedridden patients, and pulmonary embolism. This of course led to shorter length of hospital stay. I totally agree with this research. I work on a Med/Surg Stroke unit. Many of these patients have physical deficits from the stroke and they usually suffer from pressure ulcers and DVT if necessary safety measures are not taken. When I started working on this floor, I did not quite understand why certain nurses were so determined in placing patients with limited physical mobility on waffle mattress and sequential compression devices (SCDs). When I questioned one of those nurses, she explained to me that waffle mattress will provide air distribution to the patient’s skin and will therefore prevent pressure sores. These patients still need to be turned frequently for added precautions. She also educated me on poor circulation causing clots in bedridden patients. If the patient does not have contraindications to SCDs, then they must be applied to decrease the chances of developing blood clots. Blood clots are dangerous and could be life threatening. This nurse had her BSN a year ago, (she told me) and was utilizing her baccalaureate knowledge and skills to provide efficient, effective, and safe patient care for better outcomes.
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The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Health Economics and Policy
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Chapter 4 / Exercise 11
Health Economics and Policy
Henderson
Expert Verified
Blegen, M., Goode, C., Park, S., Vaughn, T., Spetz, J., (2013). Baccalaureate Education in Nursing and Patient Outcomes. Retrieved WEEK 3 DQ 2 The difference between the DNP and the Ph.D. in nursing is that the DNP is more focused on advancing the understanding of nursing practice meanwhile the Ph.D. is research- and science-oriented, and it prepares graduates to develop new, evidence-based knowledge for the nursing profession. Graduates from a DNP program have both clinical and leadership skills and will be poised to translate nursing research into evidence-based standards of care, allowing them to lead interdisciplinary care teams, improve care systems, and evaluate outcomes among specific patient populations. Ph.D. graduates can lead research teams and design and implement studies that address disease trajectories and care systems, (American Sentinel University, 2014). We can summarize these statements by saying that Ph.D. creates knowledge for practice and DNP uses knowledge in practice. My goal in the nursing profession is to become a DNP. I have a passion for the clinical setting and I am looking at leading change and improve patient outcomes. Improving nursing practice and patient outcome is only possible through the use, implementation, and sustaining evidence-based practice changes, initiating quality improvement projects, and leadership. Long research is not really my thing. I am a nurse and I love patient care. Reference American Sentinel University, (2014). DNP vs Ph.D in nursing: The difference and the future of nursing. Retrieved from - programs-what-is-the-difference-between-the-dnp-and-ph-d/ WEEK 4DQ1 Choose one legislator on the state or federal level who is also a nurse

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