MATH
D1-The-Ultimate-Student’s-Guide-to-Preparing-for-the-AP-Spanish-Language-Exam-v2.pdf

Heres a chart of a few commands for example tú tú

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Here’s a chart of a few commands for example. Tú + Ud. Uds. hablar habla no hables hable hablen comer come no comas coma coman servir sirve no sirvas sirva sirvan despertarse despiértate no te despiertes despiértese despiértense vivir vive no vivas viva vivan
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The Ultimate AP Spanish Language Grammar Review Guide Cont. 59 Interested in an Albert license? E-mail us at [email protected] Tricky Differences There are a couple of concepts in Spanish that always trip students up, even after years of classroom experience. It is important to learn the differences between when to use ser and estar , as well as por and para . Once you master these distinctions, writing and speaking effectively will be a piece of cake! Ser vs. Estar Both verbs mean “to be.” So why can’t we use them interchangeably? Well, they do have slightly different meanings, although choosing between them is by no means an exact science. As a rule of thumb, ser is permanent and estar is temporary. There are a couple of exceptions to this general rule, but it is a good starting point. Here are the differences betwee ser and estar: SER ESTAR Establishes permanent identity/characteristics (Ella es profesora, él es alto, el vestido es azul)· Expresses origin (Soy de España)· Time, day, date (Hoy es viernes, Son las ocho de la mañana)· Time or location of an event (El concierto es en el estadio)· Passive voice (El libro fue escrito por Gabriel García Márquez) Location of an object (El libro está en la mesa)· Progressive tense (Yo estoy caminando a la escuela)· Description, especially when the condition has resulted from a change (La ventana está abierta)· Death, although this is permanent (Cervantes está muerto)
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The Ultimate AP Spanish Language Grammar Review Guide Cont. 60 Interested in an Albert license? E-mail us at [email protected] Some general distinctions to keep in mind: 1. ser is the norm with adjectives, while estar indicates change 2. ser indicates objective reality, while estar indicates subjective opinion 3. ser describes inherent characteristics, while estar describes a condition or state that can change Here’s an expert tip for the AP exam: go with your gut! When it doubt, just say the sentence in your head to see what sounds right. Deep down, your brain knows. Trust it! Obsessing over ser and estar while you’re proofreading will only lead to you changing your answer to the wrong one. Instead, look for obvious errors, and trust your instinct on the more ambiguous parts. Por and Para Por and para both mean “for,” so how do we know which one to use? Lucky for you, we’re here to help you master the differences between these tough prepositions. As a general rule, use the acronym DIDO for para; for everything else, use por.
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