The great debate lincoln versus douglas lincoln

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The Great Debate: Lincoln Versus Douglas Lincoln challenged the devastating debater, Douglas, to a series of debate from August-October 1858. At first glance, it seemed like Douglas had the upper hand, he had a booming voice while Lincoln’s was quieter and high-pitched. He relied on logic rather than loudness. In the most famous debate, held in Freeport, Illinois, Lincoln posed a question: if the people of the territory should vote slavery down, and since the Supreme Court decreed they could not, who should win, the Court or the people? Douglas’ reply became known as the “Freeport Doctrine.” He said that no matter what the Supreme Court said, if the people voted slavery down, then it shall stay down. Laws to protect slavery would have to be passed on a local level. Douglas was supported by history. As seen in Jefferson’s embargo, if the public does not agree with federal law, it is almost impossible to enforce. Douglas won the senatorial race against Lincoln, mainly because he stayed true to popular sovereignty. However, it was seen that, even though more pro-Douglas members were elected than pro-Lincoln, a larger amount of the population of Illinois was pro-Lincoln. Although defeated, had stepped into the political spotlight. He became a potential Republican nominee for president. Douglas actually hurt his chances of the presidency as his defiance of the Supreme Court was not received well by the South and split his own party. The Lincoln –Douglas debates were just another preliminary battle of the Civil War. John Brown: Murderer of Martyr In bleeding Kansas, John Brown was ready to invade the South with his followers, give the slaves arms and establish as black free-state as a sanctuary. He secured funding from northern abolitionists and arrived in Virginia with twenty men. At Harper’s Ferry, Brown captured the federal arsenal in October of 1859. He incidentally killed innocent people, failed to rise the slaves and was captured by the U.S. Marines under the command of Colonel Robert E. Lee. He would ironically become the general of the Confederate army. Brown was convicted of murder and treason, and pleaded insanity. Despite this, he was sentenced to be hanged, and his demeanor dignified and courageous. His dedication to freedom was inflexible. With his death, Brown became a famous martyr for the abolitionists. The events at Harpers Ferry had calamitous effect. The South considered Brown and the abolitionists as murderers. Even though moderate northerners did not commend Brown’s actions, the South believed all of the North loved him. The abolitionists and free-soilers were infuriated by his execution, they believed he was an earnest reformer. They revered him as a saint and even compared him with Jesus.

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