Overexposure to radiation can cause severe or

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new exposures have been adequately quantified. Overexposure to radiation can cause severe or irreversible health effects to the worker. The results for the radar density measurement of the RTF are listed in the table below: Table 2: Radar Test Facility Power Density Measurements Location Antenna Power (Watts) Distance from Antenna (ft) Power Density (Near Field) (µW/cm 2 ) Power Density (Far Field) (µW/cm 2 ) Radar Unit 1 50,000 150 17,131,354.66 1903.47 Radar Unit 2 110,000 150 828,738,387.1 4187.65 Recommendation: OSHA does not currently provide guidance on microwave (MW) radiation exposure levels. The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) 2019 Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) and Biological Exposure Indices (BEI) offers guidance on hazard distances for MW radiation exposure. Please contact BSCI with any questions about an MW radiation exposure survey. Laser Laboratory Acme Manufacturing Co. informed BSCI about their plan to construct a Laser laboratory (LL), in which employees will use Class III, IIIA, and IIIB lasers. Lasers produce non-ionizing radiation, which may cause injuries if employees are not trained on their use, and if control measures are not established before construction. The recommended safety measures below are based on information provided to BSCI by Acme Manufacturing Co., ALARA, and the hierarchy of controls concepts.
UNIT VIII FINAL PROJECT17 Recommendation: A job hazard analysis (JHA) needs to be conducted before construction. The employer, employees, and the design team all need to be involved for the most effective outcome. A JHA will identify potential hazards of each process performed in the LL, which will help drive safety controls that are needed. Once a JHA for each process has been completed, BSCI recommends that less hazardous lasers are used inside the LL, such us lower classes with a lower power output, which will decrease the potential for injuries. The type of laser systems that will be purchased need to be considered. Enclosed laser systems, for example, significantly reduce potential laser exposure because it has several safety control measures already installed. An enclosed system provides safety controls such as interlocks, which turn off the laser if the laser housing is removed. If the type of laser system is not enclosed and does not provide housing, other safety measures must be developed. For example, engineering controls to restrict/limit access, barriers, curtains, and beam stop. Adding physical barriers also increases the distance from the hazard. Administrative controls such as operation time, warning signs/labels, training on standard operating procedures, and limiting work after hours. Appropriate PPE, such as laser goggles, with the right optical density and clothing, are also crucial to succeed in providing workers a safe working environment. Only trained and authorized personal should be allowed in the LL. OSHA also refers to the American National Standard (ANSI)Z136.1-2007 for Safe Use of Lasers, which provides additional information on requirements to establish a safe and compliant laser radiation safety program.

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