Were a long way from the movement of 2011 Yes and no Yes because on the ground

Were a long way from the movement of 2011 yes and no

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We're a long way from the movement of 2011! Yes and no. Yes, because on the ground, the Free Syrian Army, which best represented the rebellion, has lost a great deal of territory and the other rebel movements have little or no democratic vocabulary. No, because the ideals of 2011 and part of those who shared them are still present. The insurgents who wish only to overthrow the dictatorship and allow the Syrian people to choose the government they want for their country are numerous. The civilian population remains active through diverse projects of organisation and resistance in the zones held by rebels. The young and less young who participated in the protest of 2011 are involved in these projects, or in any case those who are still there, because many have left the country because of the violence of which they were the target. Many others have been arrested, imprisoned, tortured or executed. It's too complex, it's very hard to understand! That's for certain. Chaos is often the inevitable result of a war which drags on with no political perspective in view. Foreign intervention, diverse opposing forces, diverse fronts superimposed : the situation is so complex that sometimes it becomes illegible even for those involved. International reticence has encouraged this development: the feeling of abandonment of many insurgents facing the barbary and the repression of the Syrian regime made them turn towards radical extremists. With so little means, soldiers join the fundamentalist brigades who can arm them and give them a minimum allowance to help them and their families to survive. The Free Syrian Army waited in vain for aid from the Occident which would have prevented the radicalisation of these soldiers. Daech thrives on chaos. This movement has also attracted hundreds of disenfranchised young people from around the world to Syria to join their troops.
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> Syria: the story of the conflict On the ground: Who's fighting who? Who controls what? A dynamic and uncertain struggle for position The front lines between the different zones evolve with each combat, offensive and conquest by one or another of the forces present. They depend mostly on outside support and aid for men and arms. As a result, since the beginning of the conflict, we have witnessed an unending wavering as the groups successively strengthen or weaken, without forasmuch ever giving any one group a decisive military advantage on the ground. Since April 2015, a large offensive led by a group which united different rebel formations has inflicted some important defeats on the forces of the regime, who have lost the control of some cities and certain strategic positions mainly in the North, but also in the South. Their decline is also flagrant in their confrontations with the forces of Daech, who took over a large portion of territory in eastern Syria last May, including the historical city of Palmyra.
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  • Winter '16
  • mo
  • Syrian regime, Free Syrian Army, bachar al assad

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