Course Hero Logo

Development of the skills theory of leadership the

Course Hero uses AI to attempt to automatically extract content from documents to surface to you and others so you can study better, e.g., in search results, to enrich docs, and more. This preview shows page 16 - 19 out of 46 pages.

Development of the Skills Theory of LeadershipThe Skills Theory of leadership became noticeable in 1955, during the BehaviouralEra of Leadership when Robert Katz published his paper "Skills of an EffectiveAdministrator" in the "Harvard Business Review." M.D. Mumford and his team furtherdeveloped the theory with their paper "Leadership Skills for a Changing World:Solving Complex Problems, “published in "The Leadership Quarterly".Katz (1974) and Mumford, Zaccaro, Harding, Jacobs, and Fleishman (2000) suggestthat the skills approach implies that skills, knowledge, and abilities are needed for aleader to be effective.2.2.2Evaluation and application of the Skills Theory by the TST ExecutiveDirectorThe theory focused on:Technical SkillsTechnically skilled people are competent and knowledgeable with respect to theactivities specific to an organisation, rules and standard operating procedures, andthe organization’s products and services (Katz, 1974).Technical skills are mostimportant at supervisory levels of management and they become less importanthigher the management hierarchy.Page | 12
Human SkillsHuman skills are required for a leader to work with people based on the leader`sknowledge about how the people behave, how they work in groups, how tocommunicate effectively with them, their motives, attitudes, and feelings (Katz, 1974;Yukl, 2006.Conceptual SkillsLeaders with higher levels of conceptual skills are good at thinking through the ideasthat form an organisation and its vision for the future, expressing these ideas inverbal and written forms, understanding and expressing the economic principlesunderlying their organisation’s effectiveness. This skill is most important for topmanagers, less important for middle managers, and least important for supervisorymanagers (Northouse, 2010). While conceptual skills are less important at lowerlevels of management, (Yukl, 2006) suggest that they should be cascaded down tolower levels.Mumford,et al. (2000) identified three competencies that result in effectiveleadership: problem solving, social judgment, and knowledge.Problem solving skills involve defining problems and issues that are important,accumulating information related to the problem, developing new ways ofcomprehending each problem, and developing unique, first-of-its-kind alternatives forsolving the problems or issues (Mumford et al (2000).Page | 13
Social judgement skills enable leaders to comprehend people and the socialsystems within which they work, play, and have a social life (e.g., friends andfamily).Knowledge as the gathering of information and the development of mentalstructures to organise that information in a meaningful way.Margaret attends to most of her employees` social gatherings such as weddings andfunerals. She allows employees to take some days off whenever they have familyevents or attending to other social needs. Her social judgement skills help herunderstand what is important for her employees. From this perspective the theoryfits well in her situation.

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 46 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Spring
Professor
N/A

Newly uploaded documents

Show More

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture