A fuel model is defined as a simulated fuel complex

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A fuel model is defined as a simulated fuel complex for which all the fuel descriptors required for the solution of the fire spread model have been specified. The specific descriptors that make up a fuel model are shown in figure 13. Since the fire model only applies to surface fires, ground fuels and aerial fuels are not included in the fuel descriptors. The components that are described include needles or leaf litter, dead and down woody material, grasses and forbs, shrubs, and regeneration. Various combinations of these components make up the fuel models. There are 13 stylized fuel models that are used to make fire behavior predictions. These must represent a wide variety of fuel conditions. Choosing the appropriate fuel model requires experience and personal judgment. The 13 fuel models can be divided into four major fuel community groups. Under item H, please list the following: grass, brush, timber, and slash. On page 18, figure 14, we have fuel model descriptions for the grass group. There are three fuel models in this group. Common types or species and typical fire behavior is also given for each fuel model. On page 19 and 20, figure 15 gives us the fuel model descriptions for the brush group. There are four fuel models in this group. On page 21, figure 16 gives fuel model descriptions for the timber group. This group is represented by three fuel models. On page 22, figure 17 gives fuel model descriptions for the slash group. Again, we have three fuel models in this group. We are merely introducing these fuel model descriptions to you at this time. You will be referring back to them as you complete exercises later in the unit. On pages 23 and 24, you will find the fire behavior fuel model key. It is presented as a guide to help you select an appropriate fuel model for the type of fuel that will carry the fire. This key is only a guide. You must always go to the fuel model descriptions on pages 18 through 22 to check your choice. Here's how the key works. There are four primary divisions or choices in the key. These correspond to the four major fuel community groups -grass, brush, timber, and slash. Under division 1, you are given three choices, A, B, and C. The brief descriptions will guide you to a fuel model selection. We want you to become better acquainted with the fuel model key. On page 25, exercise 1 is intended for that purpose. Please read the instructions; then do the exercises. When you have finished, return to the text. You should have checked your answers with those on page 29. On page 26, we have a table which consolidates certain information about the 13 fire behavior fuel models. Figure 18 identifies the fuel classes that are present and considered in the development of each fuel model. Note that fuel model 1 includes only fine dead fuels and that fuel model 2 includes live fuel and
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all three dead size classes. Please take a few moments to look over the table and to note the information at the bottom of the page. When you have finished, return to the text.
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  • Spring '04
  • MIchealJenkins
  • Combustion, fuel, Wildfire

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