Magrach Ainhoa and Jaboury Ghazoul Climate and Pest Driven Geographic Shifts in

Magrach ainhoa and jaboury ghazoul climate and pest

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Magrach, Ainhoa and Jaboury Ghazoul. "Climate and Pest-Driven Geographic Shifts in Global Coffee Production: Implications for Forest Cover, Biodiversity and Carbon Storage." Plos ONE , vol. 10, no. 7, 15 July 2015, pp. 1-15. EBSCO host , doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0133071. In this piece of work, Ghazoul and Magrach give a perspective as to why our coffee crop will have 56% less land than needed and this is only the beginning. They also state that pests are also being shown as a rather large issue in their studies as all of the pest are having to go to the
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spot where all of the coffee agriculture is moving as well. This is leading to an even higher percentage loss than the 56% and will show a percentage of around 77%. These numbers are also given as best case scenarios given that the soil is providing maximum nutrients and the rainfall is average or above average. At the end of the article, they state ways as to how they can prevent this from happening in the best way possible. This article is definitely written for anyone that is seen in a state of power to change the way people abuse the environment. They simplify a lot of terms such as Arabica coffee and then they go on to state that this is the main source of coffee that we drink. This article, being a scholarly reviewed research paper, does not appeal to ethos or pathos, but it does use plenty of logos as they back their statements with proven studies and graphs. The arrangement of the article is also really helpful when it comes to understanding the information. They set it up to where you get an overview, get the general details, and then it branches out into smaller details and finally the way to fix it. They also have an extremely formal tone which helps get rid of any bias that there may be in something other than a scholarly article. I believe that this is a good article for my subject because it gives me a broad spectrum of data but all the points I need are given to me in depth. It gives me and backs my claims that deforestation is affecting most coffee farms. I can use this piece to also work off of my first source as my first source did not give me any information about the prediction of loss in coffee farm space and size. Henneron, Ludovic, et al. "Forest Management Adaptation to Climate Change: A Cornelian Dilemma between Drought Resistance and Soil Macro-Detritivore Functional Diversity." Journal of Applied Ecology , vol. 52, no. 4, Aug. 2015, pp. 913-927. EBSCO host , doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12440.
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This source, unlike all of the others is focuses on the direct effect of climate change to all forests instead of the effects of climate change and deforestation on coffee. The author of this piece, Ludovic Henneron, has five main sections in this article. The first being how we need to adapt in order to save our forests and take on the up and coming damage. In the second part Henneron conducted a large scale experiment in order to find the efficiency of macro-detritivore assemblages and the condition of the soil across the world. In the third part of his paper, he uses an exploratory analysis to diagnose the scale of the issue and the response of the plants and soil.
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