The spotted tailed quoll dasyurus maculatus maculatus

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The Spotted-tailed Quoll ( Dasyurus maculatus maculatus ) was seen until the 1950s (N. Burgess, pers. comm.) and is now considered to be locally extinct and local populations of the Wombat ( Vombatus ursinus ursinus ), and Southern Elephant Seal ( Mirounga leonina ) became extinct shortly after European settlement. Invertebrates Invertebrates account for more than 99% of all global diversity but remain a poorly studied group. They play key roles in nutrient cycling, pollination, soil conditioning, seed dispersal and the delivery of essential other ecosystem services. 13 Birds of the order Passeriformes, comprise perching birds and songbirds such as honeyeaters, fairy-wrens, magpies and robins. King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 16
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Little is known about the invertebrate diversity on King Island. The lack of baseline data on invertebrates makes it difficult to discuss population trends or to propose management strategies. However, it is likely that habitat loss and fragmentation has had an impact on their abundance and diversity. The Southern Hairy Red Snail ( Austrochloritis victoriae) is the only invertebrate currently listed under the TSP Act that is known to occur on King Island (Table 1). This snail is known only from the northeastern coast on King Island and southern Victoria, south of the Great Dividing Range (Smith & Kershaw 1981). Until 1996 the Southern Red Hairy Snail was considered extinct in Tasmania. It lives in damp areas with well-developed paperbark, tea tree and Banksia scrub (Bonham 2009). 3.5 Current EBPC Act and TSP Act listings A summary of flora and fauna species on King Island listed as threatened under the EPBC Act and TSP Act is provided in Table 1. Prioritisation of species for management can be found in Chapter 5 and Appendices 2 and 3. Listed species not considered in the Plan Marine listed species under the EPBC Act, are not considered in the Plan, unless they are also listed as threatened under the TSP Act and/or have a significant breeding population on the Island. Migratory listed species under the EPBC Act have been considered within the Plan, but management actions have been prioritised on the basis of their threatened status under the EPBC and TSP Acts, the relative contribution of King Island to their conservation in Tasmania, the occurrence of breeding on King Island and their population size and distribution on the Island. The terrestrial plants coast banksia ( Banksia integrifolia subsp. integrifolia ), sticky longheads ( Podotheca angustifolia ) and coast dandelion ( Taraxacum cygnorum ), whilst presumed extinct either locally or within Tasmania, are still included in the Plan due to the possibility of their being discovered again as further survey work of the Island is undertaken. King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 17
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Table 1. Threatened flora and fauna on King Island Scientific Name Common Name TSP Act Status EPBC Act Status Australian Distribution FLORA Australina pusilla subsp. muelleri shade nettle rare NSW, ACT, Vic, Tas Austrocynoglossum latifolium forest houndstongue rare Qld, NSW, Vic, Tas
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  • Fall '14
  • The Hours, ........., Threatened species, Bass Strait, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, King Island

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