saying born this way makes it sound like if she could she would chose a

Saying born this way makes it sound like if she could

This preview shows page 3 - 5 out of 10 pages.

saying “born this way” makes it sound like if she could she would chose a different life, which is in fact not the case. Miller also believes that it shouldn’t matter what your sexuality is, humans should all be treated as equals. 6. Straight Girls Kissing , written by Rupp & Taylor (p.43) While women kissing other women has become increasingly mainstream and sometimes encouraged, the act of men kissing one another continues to be stigmatized. Why is our culture more accepting of women kissing each other in public, at parties, and in movies while rejecting the same behavior in men? According to Rupp and Taylor, women are thought to be more “sexually fluid” than men. So in general, women can get away with kissing or being sexual with the same sex and still be considered straight. What role does social construction play in the social acceptance of straight women kissing? How are these activities policed through social control? Well a social construction of woman kissing woman are like the examples shared in this section; songs like “I kissed a girl” or things like “Top 10 chick kissing scenes”. These are normal things we see in our culture, but you don’t see this with men. For some reason it’s a social norm for a girl to kiss another girl at a social setting and still remain straight, but it's not the same if a guy were to kiss another guy. How does the act of straight women kissing contradict dominant notions of matching sexual behaviors, sexual desires, and sexual identities? How is this contradiction comparable to “dude sex” discussed in Ward’s article, “Straight Dude Seeks Same”? This contradicts it, because in the scenario of a straight woman kissing another straight women their sexual behavior and sexual identities are not their same. Also their sexual desires are somewhere in the middle depending on what their motivation is. This is similar to “dude sex” because in that scenario those men’s sexual identities are straight, but their sexual behaviors are by societal standards bisexual or homosexual. Their sexual desire could be either depending on the man.
Rupp and Taylor reference the “male gaze,” whereby men are the viewers and women are the viewed. Is there an equivalent “female gaze”? How are the power dynamics different when women are the viewers? I think that their are certain things about a man that women tend to notice if they are sexually attracted to them, but I don’t think the “female gaze” is as overpowering in our society as the “male gaze” is. We see the “male gaze” in movies, tv shows, music videos, etc. Chapter 2: Sections 1-2 1) Alfred Kinsey and the Kinsey Report

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture