Current hunting practices are not considered a threat

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Bennett’s Wallaby, Pheasant and Wild Turkey. Current hunting practices are not considered a threat to King Island’s native fauna. However populations of targeted species should be monitored and bag limits altered accordingly. Climate change Climate change is a potential threat to species on King Island. Trends predict changes in fire regimes, the frequency and severity of storm events and the frequency and intensity of drought in Australia (Hughes 2003). The types and severity of these future impacts on King Island are unclear. The most appropriate way forward is a flexible approach, which builds resilience within the native species to respond and adapt to the impacts of climate change. Introduction of new invasive weeds, fauna and disease The establishment of for example rabbits, new weed species, beak and feather disease or invertebrates such as the Argentine ant could have a negative consequence on the Island’s biodiversity. The introduction of new exotic invasive species or pathogens constitutes an ongoing threat to King Island’s ecological integrity, requiring continuing management. Stochastic events Stochastic events such as severe storms, drought and disease outbreaks, constitute a perennial threat to the biodiversity of King Island. As a general rule, the fewer populations of a threatened species that are known to exist, and the more restricted their geographical distribution, then the more susceptible it is to extinction by freak events such as flood, fire, and disease (Barnes et al. 2002). King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 31
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5. KING ISLAND BIODIVERSITY MANAGEMENT The overall aims of the Plan are that by 2020: there will be viable and healthy populations of all priority flora and fauna species, and vegetation communities on King Island; and the current biodiversity of King Island is maintained with no additional species considered threatened. Within this broad aim, seven management objectives have been identified to guide implementation of the Plan. 5.1 Management objectives 1. To promote the recovery of priority species, ensuring that each species persists in the long term on King Island. 2. To stop the decline and retain presence of the King Island Brown Thornbill, and King Island Scrubtit at known sites. 3. To reduce current levels of threats and risks to biodiversity on King Island. 4. To maintain and improve the extent of vegetation, including quality, connectivity and functionality for priority species on King Island. 5. To ensure no further native species or ecological communities become threatened on King Island. 6. To inform, encourage and support community participation in the implementation of the Plan. 7. To improve baseline information of biodiversity on King Island over the life of the Plan and to ensure that information is appropriately recorded and disseminated.
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