The analysis has impacted the fields of animation

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The analysis has impacted the fields of animation design, robotics, and human- computer interaction by providing a machine-based language for movement analysis. One of those projects is a Montreal-based project called “The Dancing Genome Project” (LaPointe & Crump, 2005). Sub-titled “Generation of a Human- Computer Choreography Using Genetic Algorithm”, it references the Merce Cunningham-generated technology, but does not build on it. The “genetic algorithms” are the basic locomotor movements of run, jump, turn, and fall. The program developed from this basic structure is called LIFEanimation . One concern about all of the current programs purporting to “capture” dance movements for the general purpose of creating proprietary programs to
EVIDENCE REPORT ON IMPACT OF DANCE 48 generate choreography is that, like the dance education research in general, it does not build on prior knowledge. Thus the challenges of capturing all of the elements of dance, especially the subtleties of expression and interactions, weight-sharing, and other nonverbal relationships, are not solved. 1 Why is this important to dance education, and what are the implications of this early research for the evidence of how dance impacts learning? As stated above, children-at-risk can learn to engage, predict, retain, and persevere if they move to learn. In terms of the world of technology, as neuroscientists and engineers look to elite movers in order to understand human interactions and expression, children and young adults who dance will use that technology to create movement for avatars that is not limited by anatomical constraints, will design new interactive machines, will allow students who cannot physically express themselves to “move” and respond, and, in general, will help them to be designers of new technology rather than simply consumers of such. Research Recommendations As has been shown throughout this report, there is evidence of evidence of the value of learning in and through the arts, specifically dance. This evidence shows that incorporating dance into the curriculum can, among other benefits, 1 A project currently addressing these challenges is a pilot project called “Your Brain on Dance: the neural symphony of expressive movement”, being conducted at the University of Houston in partnership with the University of Maryland, for which one of the authors of this paper is a Principal Investigator. It is offered here as an indication that the fields of neuroscience, computer engineering, and dance are on to the challenges of how to capture the practices of and learn from elite dancers. The implications for the primacy of movement as intelligence and as a fundamental aspect of human interaction and communication are important for the future of dance education as a core subject area.
EVIDENCE REPORT ON IMPACT OF DANCE 49 improve student test scores, lower drop-out rates, facilitate knowledge transfer, foster teacher morale, and support the learning of underserved populations such as kinesthetic learners, special education students, and minorities.

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