Political vs expert decision making and the role of

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Political vs. “expert” decision-making, and the role of the public(s) How far in advance to plan (and pay) for future needs like sewers, transit, hospitals, etc. o Implications include politics, design considerations, technology, rates of growth, etc. o Time horizons: council is 4 yrs.; official plan is 25 yrs.; most infrastructure lasts a century o “Chickens and eggs”: infrastructure to support growth, or growth to support infrastructure? o Capital vs. operating costs (i.e. You mean we have to maintain, and continue to pay for, what we build?)
How Official Plans address infrastructure (keep in mind their general, long-term view)
How SECONDARY PLANS address infrastructure: Detailed policies that allocate a specific number of people/jobs, or gross floor area, to defined areas o Linked to infrastructure capacity, services Phasing plans for development, and infrastructure including roads, schools, parks, stormwater management facilities (i.e. ponds), etc. Detailed Maps or Schedules showing specific existing/future facilities How Zoning By-laws address infrastructure: Can restrict land use types (residential) based on the availability of infrastructure Affix an “H” – Holding Symbol to a zoning category, only to be removed when adequate infrastructure is available “Interim Control” By-laws can be passed by Councils to effectively freeze all development in an area, to allow staff to study infrastructure (or other) needs. Corridors for infrastructure are protected * NOTE:::: CHIEF CITY PLANNER OF TORONTO = GREGG LINTERN Equity (Week 11) What is “Social” and “Equity” in a planning/development context?
- Assistance for students, etc.

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