As such the process of job analysis and design has

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achieve an objective. As such, the process of job analysis and design has both technical and political dimensions. An employer that decides a business will be most profitable if jobs are broken down into simple and highly regimented steps is making decisions about work flow, organizational structure, and job specification. These decisions influence subsequent HRM functions such as recruitment and selection, compensation, and performance management. The first step in creating a job is analyzing what work needs to be done. By delineating the desired outcomes and then working backwards to identify the desired activites, employers make strategic choices about the way work will be organized. Some organizations will organize work in a traditional or standard manner, based on full-time, permanent jobs. They may also decide to pay attention to developing the skills of workers and providing flexible work hours. This approach has been called by some as the “high road” 2. Why might employees resist job analysis? The purpose of job analysis is to collect accurate information about what a job requires, what it entails, and what it contributes. This information is often recorded in a job description. On the basis of the job description, recruitment plans are developed this basis, selection criteria are determined, and compensation is decided. Employers often turn to employees for information to inform job analysis. Employees can be a useful source of such information, but it is important to remember that workers may not be entirely forthcoming about what they do and can do. This reluctance to tell the whole story reflects the employees’ understanding that job analysis is part of an employer’s broad strategy to maximize its return on each employee hired. Workers know that their job knowledge is a source of power. Consequently, they may choose to obfuscate what they do (or can do) to maintain the existing wage-effort bargain. In effect then, job analysis is about gathering data that employers can use to alter the wage-effort bargain. In this way, job analysis can be used by employers to gain and use power. 3. How can job analysis and design negatively affect women? Job analysis also legitimizes some activities (by designating them as “work”) and de-legitimizes other activities. Such categorization may disadvantage women. For example, observing certain social rituals (e.g., acknowledging birthdays and the birth of children) or undertaking relatively thankless organizational tasks (e.g., sitting on committees, or organizing social events) may enhance the functioning of a group of workers but may not be considered “work”, and thus receive little organizational acknowledgement. Such tasks have traditionally been organized by female workers, often in addition to their regular workloads, and are generally invisible in job analysis.

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